Art Picks

Art Picks
Mina Kaye and Shane Mardjuki in Pangdemonium Productions' play, The Rise & Fall Of Little Voice.

YES, PRIME MINISTER

The Bafta-winning political comedy TV series, Yes, Prime Minister, has been turned into a West End hit by its original writers Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn. Expect a barrel of laughs from this lively British satire, which is being performed in Singapore for the first time.

Prime Minister Jim Hacker (John McAndrew, above left) and his Cabinet Secretary Sir Humphrey Appleby (Crispin Redman, right) are back. This time, they have to save the country from a financial meltdown, but will a shady deal with the Foreign Minister of Kumranistan be the answer? Directed by Robin Herford, who also directed The Woman In Black at the Kallang Theatre last year.

Where: Jubilee Hall, Raffles Hotel

MRT: City Hall

When: Till May 18, 8pm (Tue - Fri), 4pm (Sat & Sun)

Admission: $100 - $125 from Sistic

Info: There is some mature content

THE RISE & FALL OF LITTLE VOICE

Actress Mina Kaye (right, with actor Shane Mardjuki) is quite the stunner in this coming- of-age musical by theatre company Pangdemonium.

She stars as LV, a shy wisp of a girl with a secretly brilliant voice. LV's pitch-perfect interpretations of music legends from Judy Garland to Shirley Bassey snag the attention of greasy small-time talent scout Ray Say (Adrian Pang).

Expect lots of colourful 1970s nostalgia from Pangdemonium's first Singapore adaptation of a West End hit.

Where: Drama Centre Theatre, National Library Building, Level 3

MRT: Bugis/City Hall

When: Till May 18, 8pm (Tue - Sat), 3pm (Sat & Sun)

Admission: $40 - $88 from Sistic (call 6348-5555 or go to www.sistic.com.sg)

Info: Recommended for age 16 & above because of some coarse language

GENESIS: A PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION

BY SEBASTIAO SALGADO

Brazilian social documentary photographer Sebastiao Salgado is known for his marathon projects, where he meticulously captures gritty social issues such as the plight of migrant communities.

In this wide-ranging exhibition, the 70-year- old photographer has turned his lens on the untouched sweep of nature and man existing in harmony.

These 245 dramatic black-and-white photographs of rugged landscapes and traditional communities - such as the Waura Indians in the Upper Xingu region of Brazil's Mato Grosso state - transport the viewer to the far-flung corners of the globe, giving a glimpse of the fragile, beautiful environment that people should be doing more to protect.

Where: National Museum of Singapore, Exhibition Gallery 2

MRT: Dhoby Ghaut/Bras Basah

When: Till July 27, 10am - 6pm daily

Admission: Free

This article was published on May 9 in The Straits Times.

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