Bangladesh ruling party poised to cruise as opposition boycotts poll

Bangladesh ruling party poised to cruise as opposition boycotts poll
Supporters of independent candidate Hazi Mohammad Salim shout slogans as they take part in a campaign rally ahead of Bangladesh's parliamentary elections in Dhaka January 2, 2014.

DHAKA - With a brass band, horse-drawn carriages and political posters flapping overhead, the rally in an old section of the Bangladesh capital had all the trappings of a spirited election.

But the two candidates vying to represent the Lalbagh constituency, among the minority of seats to be contested by more than one candidate in nationwide polls set for Sunday, are both in the ruling Awami League, which is poised to steamroll to victory as the main opposition party sits out the vote.

The Bangladesh National Party (BNP) is boycotting in protest at Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina's move to scrap the tradition of letting a caretaker government oversee elections. The impasse undermines the legitimacy of the poll and is fuelling worries of economic gridlock and further violence in the impoverised South Asian country of 160 million.

"The acrimony between two of our main leaders has brought this country to where it is now and not just crippled our economy and growth, but also our democratic system," said Badiul Alam Majumdar, secretary of Citizens for Good Governance, a non-governmental organisation.

Either Hasina or BNP chief Begum Khaleda Zia has been prime minister for all but two of the past 22 years and there is deep enmity between them.

While the outcome of Sunday's poll seems certain, what happens afterwards is not. That could imperil Bangladesh's $22 billion garment industry, which accounts for 80 per cent of exports and has been hampered by a series of nationwide strikes, including an ongoing transportation blockade called by the BNP.

Pre-election violence that killed more than 100 people, mostly in rural areas, had eased in recent days, although two people were burnt to death early on Friday when opposition activists hurled petrol bombs at a truck in northern Dinajpur, according to police. Five polling centres were set on fire in southeastern Feni, Khaleda's hometown.

Meanwhile, verdicts in the International Crimes Tribunal investigating atrocities committed during the 1971 war of independence from Pakistan have elicited a violent reaction from activists affiliated with the Jamaat-e-Islami party, an Islamist ally of the BNP.

Last month, the first execution resulting from the tribunal was followed by deadly violence against Awami League members.

More about

Purchase this article for republication.

BRANDINSIDER

SPONSORED

Most Read

Your daily good stuff - AsiaOne stories delivered straight to your inbox
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy policy and Terms and Conditions.