Famed Syria Crusader castle survives fierce battles

Famed Syria Crusader castle survives fierce battles

AL-HOSN , Syria - Columns are blackened with soot and vaults have crumbled in one of the courtyards of Syria's the Krak des Chevaliers, a Crusader castle that is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and victim of the country's three-year civil war.

The army seized the medieval fortress on Thursday after fierce fighting in the nearby village of Al-Hosn in central Syria, routing rebels who had captured it in July 2011.

Journalists, including an AFP reporter, toured there Friday on a visit organised by the army.

Most of the 11th century fortress and its external walls appear intact but the damage is inside, in the lower courtyard.

Fires, apparently set by the rebels who were entrenched inside the fortress, have ravaged ancient pillars, while some archways and vaults have collapsed.

Huge blocs of grey stone litter the ground but it is not clear if the damage was caused during Thursday's capture of the fortress or in earlier bombardments.

The only bullet holes that can be seen are on a metal plate that once was inscribed with information for tourists who visited the Krak des Chevaliers, or Fortress of the Knights.

"We acted in a way to preserve the Krak, to make sure it would not be damaged," said a colonel who escorted the journalists on their tour.

In July 2011, four months after the Syrian conflict erupted, Sunni villagers from the village of Al-Hosn seized the Krak and were soon joined by allied rebels, including Lebanese fighters.

Islamist fighters also occupied the Krak, including jihadists from Al-Nusra Front, Al-Qaeda's Syria affiliate, and from the Jund al-Sham group.

Leftover food

The fighters were routed after fierce fighting Thursday, part of an offensive to sever rebel supply lines from neighbouring Lebanon.

They left behind all sorts of supplies.

A pot of leftover meat and rice stew can be seen in a room that rebels apparently used as a command centre and living quarters.

Rugs cover the hard stone floors, there are cot beds and, on one side of a room that apparently served as the kitchen, there is a cupboard that contains rice and a tin of vegetable shortening.

Curtains are strung across loopholes to keep the daylight out and men's clothing is strewn across the room.

More about

unesco Syria
Purchase this article for republication.

BRANDED CONTENT

SPONSORED CONTENT

Your daily good stuff - AsiaOne stories delivered straight to your inbox
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy policy and Terms and Conditions.