Founder of new China party aims to work within system

Founder of new China party aims to work within system

BEIJING - For someone who has just set up a new political party in the face of a de facto ban by a Chinese government that tolerates no dissent, Wang Zheng has surprisingly modest aims.

Wang and other supporters of disgraced senior politician Bo Xilai, who has been jailed for corruption, formed the China Zhi Xian Party - literally "the constitution is the supreme authority" party - last week. It named Bo as "chairman for life".

The Communist Party has not allowed any opposition parties to be established since it came to power following the 1949 revolution. So history suggests it will not look kindly on this new party, especially when its titular head is a former member of the Communist Party's top ranks.

But Wang, one of the party's founders, insisted in an interview that she is no anti-government revolutionary and is not challenging the Communist Party's right to govern, which she accepts is enshrined in the constitution.

Instead, the Zhi Xian Party simply wants the government to guarantee freedom of assembly and elections.

"There are many important systems provided for in the constitution, like the National People's Congress and representatives of the people at various levels, but this is not happening according to the constitution. That's what I want to stress," she told Reuters by telephone.

According to China's constitution, the "people's representatives", the equivalent of members of parliament in other countries, should be directly elected by the people.

But that does not happen in practice. Elections that do take place occur without any opposition candidates and official candidates are pre-approved and pre-screened by the Communist Party. It is widely suspected that votes cast against candidates are not counted.

The constitution "says that the Communist Party will lead for the long-term, and in the present circumstances we accept that ... It's in the constitution, so we have to accept it," said Wang, 48, an associate professor of international trade at the Beijing Institute of Economics and Management.

The new party plans to hold its first congress next year to elect a vice-chairman, Wang said, declining to say how many members her new party had.

She described herself as an "initiator" of the party and accepted that forming it was a sensitive move ahead of a meeting of top leaders that started in Beijing on Saturday to map out a long-term economic plan for the country.

Wang said that she is currently under surveillance with police and plainclothed security outside her house.

Asked earlier if she was worried that she might be arrested, she said: "We are not afraid. I don't think we will be arrested."

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