Malala, Satyarthi to receive Nobel Peace Prize

Malala, Satyarthi to receive Nobel Peace Prize
(LtoR) Norway Crown Princess Mette-Marit, Crown Prince Haakon Magnus, Nobel Peace Prize laureates Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai, Norway King Harald and Queen Sonja pose at the Royal palace in Oslo on December 10, 2014.

OSLO - Malala Yousafzai, the youngest ever Nobel laureate, receives the Peace Prize on Wednesday, sharing it with Indian child rights campaigner Kailash Satyarthi.

The 17-year-old Pakistani girl, who will be given the prize in a ceremony in Oslo, became a global icon after she was shot and nearly killed by the Taliban for insisting that girls had a right to an education.

Satyarthi, 60, is recognised for a 35-year battle to free thousands of children from virtual slave labour.

Malala has already been honoured with a host of awards, standing ovations and plaudits everywhere from the United Nations to Buckingham Palace.

But on the eve of the ceremony she said she would not rest on her laurels, saying she would like one day to become prime minister in her native Pakistan.

"If I can serve my country best through politics and through becoming a prime minister then I would definitely choose that," she told the BBC.

"I want to serve my country and my dream is that my country becomes a developed country and I see every child get an education."

Pen and a book

At a press conference Tuesday in Oslo, Malala said that in many parts of the world, children's requirements are infinitely more modest than an "iPad or computer." "What they are asking for is just a book, just a pen, so why can't we do that?" Malala was 15 when a Taliban gunman shot her in the head as she travelled on a school bus in response to her campaign for girls' education.

At a press conference Tuesday in Oslo, Malala said that in many parts of the world, children's requirements are infinitely more modest than an "iPad or computer." "What they are asking for is just a book, just a pen, so why can't we do that?" Malala was 15 when a Taliban gunman shot her in the head as she travelled on a school bus in response to her campaign for girls' education.

Although she almost died, she recovered after being flown for extensive surgery in Birmingham, central England.

She has been based in the city with her family ever since, continuing both her education and activism.

For the first time ever the blood-soaked school uniform she wore when she was shot near her home in the Swat Valley in October 2012 will go on display at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo this week.

Asked why she thinks some Islamic extremist groups are so opposed to education for girls, Malala, dressed in a multi-coloured headscarf, replied: "Unfortunately, those people who stand against education, they sometimes themselves are uneducated or they've been indoctrinated".

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