Philippine mayor sorry for tweeting about 'death' of Imelda Marcos

Philippine mayor sorry for tweeting about 'death' of Imelda Marcos
Former first lady Imelda Marcos
PHOTO: Reuters

Bacoor city Mayor Lani Mercado Revilla on Monday apologised for erroneously tweeting about the death of former First Lady now Ilocos Norte Representative Imelda Marcos.

On Twitter, Revilla first tweeted her condolences to the family of the widow of the dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

"Our condolences to the Marcos family. It was a pleasure and a privilege to work with Cong. Imelda Romualdez Marcos," tweeted Revilla, the former Cavite congresswoman and wife of former senator Ramon Revilla Jr., who is detained for plunder over a pork barrel scam.

Revilla later tweeted her apologies because the 87-year-old Imelda Marcos was alive.

"I would like to apologise for my tweet which I have erased. I received a news break message informing the public about Mrs. Marcos," Revilla said.

These tweets have since been taken down.

Photo: Twitter/Lani Mercado Revilla

In a text message to the Inquirer, Revilla claimed her Twitter account was hacked.

"My Twitter account was hacked. We are having it investigated," Revilla said.

According to reports, Imelda's daughter Ilocos Norte Gov. Imee Marcos said her mom was still alive.

The husband of Imelda cemented his two-decade rule when he declared martial law in 1972. The military turned on him in 1986 and led a peaceful people uprising that toppled the dictatorship.

Imelda, who was known for her lavish lifestyle as First Lady, faces 10 criminal charges of graft before the Sandiganbayan Fifth Division for allegedly having pecuniary interests in various foundations set up by her and her husband allegedly to accumulate ill-gotten wealth.

Imelda has faced graft charges since 1991 for alleged offences when she was a member of the Interim Batasang Pambansa and as Minister for Human Settlements. She is on trial.

She also faces a civil forfeiture case involving her prized artworks by Van Gogh, Picasso, Monet, Rembrandt and Michelangelo allegedly bought through ill-gotten wealth.

 

 

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