Privacy not violated by facial recognition technology, says Taiwan police agency

Privacy not violated by facial recognition technology, says Taiwan police agency

TAIPEI - The National Police Agency (NPA) yesterday afternoon denied an opposition lawmaker's accusation of violating the law and human rights with its human face recognition system.

Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) lawmaker Li Chun-yi (李俊俋) yesterday morning held a press conference at the Legislative Yuan, arguing that the NPA's recently launched human face recognition system of its M-Police Operation System has violated the laws when accessing citizen ID pictures from the nation's household registration system.

The M-Police Operation System is a system that aims to enhance the NPA's capabilities in using mobile devices and advanced technologies. The recently launched human face recognition system is part of the M-Police system.

Li criticised that the NPA's attempt to detect crimes by accessing the household system to compare citizens' photos with criminals' photos not only violates personal privacy but also treats ordinary people like criminals.

The lawmaker further stated that with the NPA's M-Police Operation System, police could take as many photos as possible at any protest and then to spend only 10 seconds to ID a protester.

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