Report: Jong-nam's family uncontactable after his assassination

Report: Jong-nam's family uncontactable after his assassination
Kim Jong-nam
PHOTO: Reuters

PETALING JAYA - Slain Kim Jong-nam's family is uncontactable and not to be seen at their two properties in Macau, says a report.

South Korean's daily Chosun Ilbo reported that it had visited Jong-nam's two properties in Macau's old quarter on Wednesday - an eight-storey apartment and a high-rise condominium - but "no one would talk".

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Jong-nam had moved into the condominium with his family at around 2008 to make it easier for his two children to attend the international school, which is just five minutes away.

However, Jong-nam moved from the condominium unit in 2011 after South Korean residents found out where it was after his son Han-sol brought home a South Korean girlfriend.

Chosun Ilbo noted that there were no signs of Jong-nam's family anywhere.

Han-sol, 23, last year said he was heading to Macau as he left France, where he studies. But South Korean expats there said they have not seen him recently.

Jong-nam's daughter Sol-hui, 18, who graduated from school last September, has also not been seen.

"I tried to call Jong-nam's wife after learning about his assassination on the news last night, but her mobile phone was turned off. They probably had an action plan in case something bad happened to him," said a family friend.

Half-brother of N Korean leader assassinated in Malaysia

Jong-nam settled in Macau at around 2002, where he entered on a visitor visa and later gaining citizenship.

One person said Jong-nam regularly frequented three or four Korean restaurants and went to the casinos.

He reportedly did not smoke but drank one to two bottles of soju or 10 shots of boilermakers (a beer cocktail) in one sitting.

Jong-nam was also said to have a dragon tattoo on his stomach and chest, according to a person who spotted him in a sauna.

Until his father Kim Jong-il died in December 2011, Jong-nam travelled widely throughout South-East Asia and Europe.

Read also: Jong-nam fell out of favour after fake passport episode

When Jong-il suffered a massive stroke in August 2008, he flew to France and brought back neurologists to Pyongyang.

It was reported that Jong-nam always flew alone, but would show up with "female companions" when dining in restaurants across the region.

Jong-nam had been described as a "playboy heir-apparent" and reportedly had mistresses in Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia.

Read also: Malaysia may have been good hideout for Kim Jong Nam, say observers

However, Jong-nam became depressed and reclusive after his half-brother and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un executed their uncle Jang Song-taek.

He started to limit his travels to South-East Asia after his uncle's death in December 2013, supposedly because his allowance from Jang had been cut off.

Chosun Ilbo quoted a family friend of Jong-nam who said he had a personality change after his uncle's death.

"Kim Jong-nam had a bright personality, but he grew depressed after Jang Song-taek was executed and often said 'life is so sad' and expressed dismay at how his uncle was killed," said the family friend.

A North Korean source was also quoted as saying that Jong-nam had made a lot of money by running a trading business with North Korea with his uncle's help.

"The execution of his uncle and benefactor must have been a huge shock," said the source.

Jong-nam was assassinated at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport 2 after being poisoned allegedly by two female operatives from North Korea on Monday.

Read also:
China watching developments closely after death of North Korean leader's half-brother Kim Jong Nam
China media mum on Jong-nam assassination
'Jong-nam did not respond to advice to seek asylum in S. Korea'
Kim Jong Nam's death: Murder only shows up Kim Jong Un's insecurity 
N Korean leader tried to kill half-brother for 5 years: Intelligence agency

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