Textbooks allegedly promoting radicalism reported to Indonesian authorities

Textbooks allegedly promoting radicalism reported to Indonesian authorities
A member of the Ansor Youth Movement (GP Ansor) points at the highlighted words "Selesai-Raih-Bantai-Kiai" (Finish-Achieve-Slaughter-[Islamic] Teacher]) in a textbook considered to contain radical teachings at the GP Ansor office in Jakarta on Wednesday.
PHOTO: The Jakarta Post/ANN

The Ansor Youth Movement (GP Ansor), Nahdlatul Ulama's youth wing, reported a kindergarten textbook reportedly containing radical Islamic teachings to the Indonesian Child Protection Commission (KPAI) on Thursday.

Formerly used at a kindergarten in Depok, West Java, the Anak Islam Suka Membaca [Muslim Kids Like Reading] textbook reportedly contains 32 sentences that have the potential to spread radicalism among children.

KPAI secretary-general Erlinda, who reported the finding to the National Police, said the dissemination of radicalism through textbooks should be of utmost concern to everyone as it violated children's rights.

"Violence against children is not only physical but can also be in the form of teachings such as radicalism," Erlinda said as quoted by tempo.co.

On Wednesday, GP Ansor found 32 sentences that it claimed promoted radical teachings in a textbook on spelling, following a report from parents of a kindergartner in Depok.

The textbook, which was compiled and published in Surakarta, Central Java, apparently contains sentences such as "sahid di medan jihad" [die as a jihadist], "rela mati bela agama" [willingly die for religion], "hati-hati zona bahaya" [warning, dangerous zone] and "bahaya sabotase" [danger of sabotage].

"If this continues, we will be penetrated [by radical teachings]," Erlinda said.

Parents and teachers should be more aware of the content of school textbooks by reading them before giving them to their children to make sure they are not exposed to inappropriate and radical teachings, she added.

Police spokesman Insp. Gen. Anton Charliyan said the police would investigate KPAI's report to find the person responsible for the book's circulation.

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