University: Singapore students in Philippines typhoon hit-zone found and safe

University: Singapore students in Philippines typhoon hit-zone found and safe
From left to right: Alyssa Chee Pui Yee, Vanessa Chong Yuting, Eileen Heng Mei Ting. Three Singaporean students doing volunteer work in Tacloban, Philippines, have been uncontactable since Friday, when super Typhoon Haiyan hit the area.

In an official response to queries from The Straits Times, Flinders University Acting Vice-Chancellor, Professor Andrew Parkin said that the school "is delighted that the three Flinders students who were in the typhoon-affected area of the Philippines have been found safe and well".


Get the full story from The Straits Times.

Ms Chee was last reached through text messages with her boyfriend, Mr Jeremy Liang, at around 6.30am on Friday. Family and friends have lost contact with her since.


Get the full story from The Straits Times.

3 female volunteers from S'pore uncontactable after super typhoon now found safe and sound

Three Singaporean girls away on a volunteering project in Tacloban City have been uncontactable by their families since Super Typhoon Haiyan hit on Friday, Nov 8.

Amelia Chong, sister of Vanessa, is appealing for help in any information of their whereabouts, reported citizen journalism site, Stomp.

The three girls - Alyssa Chee Pui Yee, Vanessa Chong Yuting and Eileen Heng Mei Ting (all aged 23) - were due to return home next Saturday and were volunteer dieticians under 'Volunteer for the Visayans' in a month-long project.

Their families are extremely concerned, last hearing from these girls at about 5am on Friday, right before the typhoon hit and damaging communication lines.

Amelia told Stomp:

"I wouldn't like to call them as 'missing' yet.

"I would like to think of them just as uncontactable now at the moment as there are no communication networks or power in Tacloban city."

The Singapore Embassy in Manila is working with the Philippine authorities about the girls' safety.

Authorities said this is one of the deadliest recorded natural disasters in the Philippines, and the death toll could be well over 10,000.


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