Outspoken China princeling takes on President Xi

Outspoken China princeling takes on President Xi

CHINA - Chinese President Xi Jinping's conservative stance on political reform has led to a major split within the princeling community, whose members share a common interest in preserving the ruling status of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).

Mr Hu Dehua (inset in photo), the third son of the late party chief Hu Yaobang, openly criticised Mr Xi (on the right in photo) at a seminar held by the liberal magazine Yan Huang Chunqiu in mid-April. It was by far the most severe criticism lodged against Mr Xi since the latter became CCP general secretary last November.

Mr Hu Yaobang was the CCP general secretary from 1982 to 1987. He was known for "liberating" thousands of senior CCP officials purged by CCP founder Mao Zedong.

For this reason, he wielded considerable moral strength within the party. Mr Hu Yaobang's death in 1989 triggered a massive democracy movement in Tiananmen Square that was put down bloodily.

Thanks to his legacy, his two sons, Deping and Dehua, stood out as symbols of political reform amongst the princelings.

Before Mr Xi became CCP chief last November, he let it be known that he paid a visit to Mr Hu Deping and had a long chat with him. Many considered this an attempt by Mr Xi to build an image as an enlightened leader.

Now, however, Mr Xi has been taken to task by Mr Hu Dehua.

He started with Mr Xi's speech to party colleagues during his southern tour early this year.

In it, the President stated that the Soviet Union collapsed because the party had disarmed itself by allowing the army to be loyal to the country rather than the party.

"One lesson to draw is that we should forever grasp firmly the gun and not to disarm ourselves," the President said.

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