Any adventures for the soul on your bucket list?

Any adventures for the soul on your bucket list?
The Bucket List is about two terminally ill men, played by Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson, who escape from a cancer ward and take off on a road trip with a wish list of "to-dos" before they die.

I have just re-watched The Bucket List. This movie is about two terminally ill men, played by Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson, who escape from a cancer ward and take off on a road trip with a wish list of "to-dos" before they die.

When the movie was released in 2007, it generated much attention and many were moved to draw up their own lists.

I have yet to write my bucket list, but one item that will definitely be on it is a trip to Alaska to watch bears catch salmon. The salmon run is an incredible nature spectacle which I have watched countless times on TV.

Drawing up a bucket list need not be a depressing affair. It can be quite fun to list down the places you want to visit or the crazy things you want to do, like bungee jumping or skydiving, before you say goodbye to this world.

I would extend my list beyond these adventures - exciting as they may be - to add some adventures for the soul.

For instance, a friend recently took a few days to rough it out with the homeless, in order to "walk a mile in their shoes".

He slept on five-foot-ways and hung out in soup kitchens. I believe that was a life-changing experience for him.

There are many other such journeys that are worthy of being added to a bucket list, including spending time with people who are disadvantaged, have weathered life's storms or are truly inspirational by the way they live.

Instead of spending hours ranting on social media about every issue in the nation, use that time to visit your neighbour of another race or religion.

These are experiences that add new perspectives and feed the soul. They also change us in unexpected ways, adding strength to character and teaching us to count our blessings and to love others.

Such adventures will fit into the "moral bucket list" mentioned by David Brooks in his latest column in The New York Times.

The gist of his article, which has gone viral, is about how the relentless pursuit of career success, recognition and money is meaningless if it does not add depth to one's soul.

I like the way Mr Brooks compares resume virtues with eulogy virtues: "The resume virtues are the skills you bring to the marketplace. The eulogy virtues are the ones that are talked about at your funeral - whether you were kind, brave, honest or faithful."

So what will you include in your bucket list, and how many of those items will add to your eulogy virtues?

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