Dutchman has bitcoin 'wallets' inserted in hands

Dutchman has bitcoin 'wallets' inserted in hands
The chips, enclosed in a 2mm by 12mm capsule of "biocompatible" glass, were injected by a professional using a special syringe.

THE HAGUE - A Dutch bitcoin entrepreneur has had two microchips containing the virtual currency injected into his hands to help him make contactless payments.

The chips, enclosed in a 2mm by 12mm capsule of "biocompatible" glass, were injected by a professional using a special syringe.

They emit a tiny radio signal using Near Field Communication (NFC) and can store up to 888 bits of information each.

"We wanted to do this experiment to push further the concept of the virtual wallet," Martijn Wismeijer, co-founder of MrBitcoin which installs bitcoin cash distributors, told AFP.

Using NFC, the chips can communicate with devices such as Android smartphones or tablets.

"What's stored on the microchips should be seen as a savings account," rather than a current account, Wismeijer said.

"The payment device remains the smartphone, but you transfer funds from the chips," said Wismeijer, who was injected with the chips along with a handful of other people on November 3.

His experiment has garnered so much publicity that he has temporarily withdrawn the money from his hands for security reasons.

"The aim wasn't for everyone to know about it," he said, laughing.

The chips are available on the Internet, sold with a syringe for US$99 (S$127.96) by the Dangerous Things company.

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