Yolkless egg discovery rattles Twittersphere

Yolkless egg discovery rattles Twittersphere
These yolkless eggs are also called cock's, dwarf, wind, or fart eggs, and are usually detected and sorted out before they are available for consumers.
PHOTO: Twitter @Chuchnsdboy

What do yolkless eggs, dragon-like lizards, rainbow-headed snakes and invisibility cloaks have in common?

They are all real.

If you thought 2016 is the year for the good, the fake, and the absurd, you have not seen it all.

The latest shocking discovery in 2016 hails from Japan, and it is an egg without a yolk.

A photo of the bizarre egg was uploaded on Twitter by a Japanese housewife who goes by the Twitter handle @Chuchnsdboy.

on Twitter

Clearly startled by her discovery, @Chuchnsdboy tweeted: "Housewife for nine years and this is the first time."

Twittersphere was set ablaze after she shared her rare find on Dec 9, garnering over 58,000 retweets and over 76,000 likes.

After doing some research, @Chuchnsdboy concluded in another tweet that the egg was edible and promptly ate it, reported Japanese-language news blog RocketNews24.

on Twitter

Most of the Japanese twitter community reacted in disbelief to the yolkless egg, RocketNews24 added.

One reader wrote: "I've been alive for 70 years and this is the first time I've ever seen something like this!"

These yolkless eggs are also called cock's, dwarf, wind, or fart eggs, and are usually detected and sorted out before they are available for consumers.

Because of the missing yolk, fart eggs were erroneously thought to be laid by roosters, thereby hatching a mythical beast called the cockatrice - a two-legged dragon or serpent-like creature with a cock's head - which sound pretty legit in 2016, especially with the prevalence of fake news.

Western superstition dictated that these eggs had to be thrown over the owner's house and smashed at the other end without touching the roof, so as to destroy the beast in the egg.

In reality, fart eggs are usually formed when a hen produces eggs for the first time, or from complications in the laying process.

grongloh@sph.com.sg

 

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