Preliminary national unity blueprint may be delayed

Preliminary national unity blueprint may be delayed
National Unity Consultative Council (NUCC) deputy chairman, Tan Sri Lee Lam Thye and NUCC chairman Tan Sri Samsudin Osman (shown here) had been having discussions with non-governmental organisations who had requested to present their views to the panel.

PETALING JAYA - The preliminary National Unity Blueprint that is being drawn up by the National Unity Consultative Council (NUCC) may not be ready in time to meet its July deadline.

The panel's deputy chairman, Tan Sri Lee Lam Thye, said the NUCC might not be able to come up with the document in time because the panel's secretariat was still compiling feedback from its series of unity dialogues.

He said the unity dialogues were held in February and March nationwide to get the people's views on unity.

Apart from the dialogues, which received positive response from the hundreds who attended, Lee said the NUCC also had five working committees which were talking to experts on national unity issues.

He said both he and NUCC chairman Tan Sri Samsudin Osman had also been having discussions with non-governmental organisations who had requested to present their views to the panel.

Lee said the NUCC would meet on May 17 to discuss the feedback from the dialogues before adding it to the preliminary blueprint.

He added that the panel did not want to hurry the preliminary report.

"We cannot rush through things. We want to ensure that the preliminary blueprint covers all aspects," he said yesterday.

"I believe the NUCC chairman will request for more time (to prepare the preliminary blueprint) from the Prime Minister's Depart­ment soon."

Samsudin said there were many weighty issues surrounding unity that needed to be focused on.

"We don't want to rush into things because we have two years to come up with the (final) blueprint," he said.

"However, we will be updating the Prime Minister on what we have."

The NUCC was launched last November to look into issues surrounding race and unity. The council's members included community leaders, NGO representatives, academicians and politicians from both sides of the political divide.

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