Rich nations must chip in to help developing ones fight climate change

Rich nations must chip in to help developing ones fight climate change
Malaysian Natural Resources and Environment Minister Datuk Seri Dr Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar (left).

KUALA LUMPUR - One hundred billion US dollars or RM425bil (S$140 billion). That is the price developed countries must fork out each year if they want to help developing ones fight climate change.

This is the argument that Malaysia will bring to the COP21 United Nations climate talks in Paris, as it pledges to reduce its impact on the planet, said Natural Resources and Environment Minister Datuk Seri Dr Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar.

"There's supposed to be a green fund put up by the developed nations. There must be US$100bil each year to (help) finance developing nations to come up with technology (transfer) and capacity building.

"This assistance must be transparent," he told The Star in an interview.

He did not say how long rich countries would have to do this.

However, India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi said earlier this week that this should be mobilised by 2020.

Dr Wan Junaidi said Malaysia viewed climate change very seriously, with the fear that some parts of the country may disappear under water by 2100.

The Star reported earlier that some parts of Malaysia could see sea levels rise by as much as 1m during that time.

The COP21 talks began on Nov 30, and will end on Dec 11. Its aim will be to come up with a binding global agreement to tackle climate change.

In its climate change action plan sent to the United Nations late last month, Malaysia said it would cut the intensity of greenhouse gas emission by 45 per cent by 2030. This move would take place from 2021 to 2030.

Of this 45 per cent, 10 per cent would only be done if developed countries gave Malaysia the money, technology and help to fight climate change.

However, Dr Wan Junaidi said developed countries did not give any money and were also "very selective" with help.

He added that the First World appeared to put the onus of fighting climate change on emerging countries.

"This is not fair! We are a trading nation!" he said, implying that it would stunt Malaysia's move to developed status.

In 2009, Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak pledged to cut Malaysia's emission intensity of its GDP by 40 per cent by 2020, with help from the developed world.

In 2014, Najib said in a speech that Malaysia achieved a 33 per cent cut so far, even without this help.

Dr Wan Junaidi is expected to fly off to Paris later this week.

More about

Purchase this article for republication.

BRANDED CONTENT

SPONSORED CONTENT

Your daily good stuff - AsiaOne stories delivered straight to your inbox
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy policy and Terms and Conditions.