Shoppers of all races head to Low Yat Plaza

Shoppers of all races head to Low Yat Plaza
Bouncing back: Business at Low Yat is slowly getting back to normal as shoppers return.
PHOTO: The Star/ANN

KUALA LUMPUR - The fracas at Low Yat Plaza appeared to be a mere blip on the radar, as Malaysians came together at open houses and malls for their favourite pastimes - eating and shopping - during Hari Raya.

Yesterday, the tech mall hardly looked like the place where a brawl took place a week ago and the mood was in stark contrast to the tense atmosphere then with shoppers chatting and haggling with traders as they checked out the latest phones and gadgets.

There were also many Malay shoppers, clad in their bright coloured baju Melayu and baju kurung at the mall although the number of visitors were fewer than on an average day.

Traders, however, said the reason could be because most people had gone back to their hometowns to celebrate the festive season.

Among the shoppers was Mohd Najib Yusof, who lives in nearby Taman Maluri. The 38-year-old and his nephews were looking for a new notebook.

"We came here early to avoid the crowd later in the day. I know what happened here but that was just some people trying to provoke other­­s into doing something. I am here to shop, I am not too worried about anything else here," he said, cradling his young daughter.

Another customer, student Ahmad Firdaus Ahmad Helmi, 21, who wanted to buy a new phone and laptop with his duit raya, said: "There is no problem being here. I work near here and I have bought a lot of things at Low Yat before.

"People have their opinions on the products here, including the selling of fake goods but so far I am okay with this place," he said.

Toll plaza operator Muhammad Adha Abdul Samad, who came to buy a new phone said: "I work in a toll booth and I see people of all races everyday. I live in Batu Caves near Chinese and Indians. I don't see them as people of other races, they are just friends. We are all friends," he said.

Muhammad Adha, who is from Sandakan, Sabah, said he was saddened when he saw postings on social media and videos of the brawl.

"This was just one incident created by people who did not understand what had happened," he said.

Two gamers, who only wished to be known as Andy and Azul, said they were shocked when they learnt about the affray, adding that the only thing they thought about was the safety of their friends who sold games here.

"We have been coming here for a long time and I don't agree with what people said about one race trying to cheat others.

"We share the same interest and help each other," said Andy, who bought a PlayStation 3 as a Hari Raya gift for himself.

It was also business as usual yesterday evening, even after rumours were spread that there would be a gathering of non-governmental organisations in front of the mall, prompting an increased police pre­sence in front of the building.

Inspector-General of Police secretariat's assistant head (corporate communications) Asst Comm Datin Asmawati Ahmad said police tightened security to prevent any untoward incidents.

"We will continue to beef up security for the good of the public," she said.

Police also set up several checkpoints along Jalan Bulan, Jalan Imbi and Jalan Bukit Bintang.

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