'Lifelogging' camera shrugs off privacy to seize the moment

'Lifelogging' camera shrugs off privacy to seize the moment
Co-founder and CEO of Swedish company Memoto, Martin Kaellstroem, shows the life-logging Memoto camera on August 29, 2013 in Stockholm’s old town.

STOCKHOLM - When Martin Kaellstroem was a young adult, he lost both his parents to cancer. It became a spur for him to seize the day, as a person and an entrepreneur.

The result: A lens with no off-button that captures every moment of your life.

The 38-year-old co-founder of Swedish company Memoto is a man in a hurry as he promotes his "lifelogging" camera, which is worn with a clip on the shirt or on a string around the neck, and takes a picture once every 30 seconds.

"When you lose your parents, you realise that you don't live forever. It has definitely affected me in my entrepreneurship. I can't wait until later to fulfil my dreams, I have to live my dream now," he said.

Some may see parallels with George Orwell's 1984, the Truman Show or other dystopias. But the team behind the Memoto camera insists that it doesn't breach any privacy. Rather, they see it as a way to collect memories.

"Traditionally, people only brought their camera to special events when everyone was dressed up, smiling into the camera," Kaellstroem said.

"But you don't know in advance which moments will be important in the future. Perhaps you meet your future wife or witness an accident or a crime, pictures you might want to return to."

Lifelogging, a technique for digitally gathering daily moments, is a growing phenomenon, gaining popularity with mobile applications such as Saga, which creates info graphics summarising your life through your smartphone data, and health trackers like Runkeeper and Moves.

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