Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine offers a different model of education: Heng

Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine offers a different model of education: Heng

SINGAPORE - "Our healthcare system must remain responsive, and our healthcare professionals must be prepared to continually develop new capabilities to meet rising public expectations, and increasing demand for more specialised services," said Mr Heng who was speaking at the official opening of the annex building of Nanyang Technological University's medical school.


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Here is the full speech by Education Minister Heng Swee Keat:

It is my pleasure to be here today at the official opening of the Annex building of Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine (LKCMedicine) Novena Campus, and to mark the naming of the Toh Kian Chui Annex.

Diversity of Medical Education

LKCMedicine is Singapore's second medical school for undergraduate training. It is a strategic collaboration between the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and Imperial College London. Many of you have worked hard to make this a reality, from the time the establishment of the second undergraduate medical school was announced in 2010, all the way up to the matriculation of its first batch of 54 undergraduate medical students in Aug 2013.

I would like to congratulate all the stakeholders of LKCMedicine - NTU, Imperial College, the Ministry of Health, and the National Healthcare Group - for this achievement, and to thank all donors for their contributions.

The launch of LKCMedicine was also a milestone in our medical education landscape. Besides training more doctors, LKCMedicine provides a model of medical education that differs from what is currently offered at our other medical schools, NUS's Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine and the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School.

This diversity allows Singapore to draw on the strengths of various approaches to medical education, and benefit from the best of different pedagogies. This is especially important as Singapore's healthcare demands evolve.

Our healthcare system must remain responsive, and our healthcare professionals must be prepared to continually develop new capabilities to meet rising public expectations, and increasing demand for more specialised services.

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