When travel plans go awry

When travel plans go awry
A busy scene at KLIA2 after the new airport opened on Thursday. Many Malaysians, according to a senior insurance agency manager, have the wrong perception that travel insurance is redundant.

With the new KLIA2 runway finally opened and AirAsia moving its operations here from LCCT on Friday, travellers are bracing themselves for the usual glitches that come with the opening of a new airport.

Legal officer Mandy Soo, 35, who is flying from Kuala Lumpur to Miri, Sarawak, in June, is considering getting travel insurance for her trip.

"It will be the first time I am flying out from KLIA2, so I'm hoping for the best but also preparing for the worst," says the adventure buff who plans to hike up the Mulu Pinnacles.

"I've already paid for the guide, accommodation and transportation package, so I can't afford to miss the flight. It will be my first time buying travel insurance."

Copywriter Ding never buys travel insurance despite travelling at least five times a year.

"If I lose my luggage, there's nothing much inside anyway," says the 30-year-old globe-trotter who has travelled to about 40 countries.

Many Malaysians, according to a senior insurance agency manager, have the wrong perception that travel insurance is redundant. This probably explains why travel insurance is still unpopular here.

"Life and personal accident insurance cover death and accidents but what happens if your flight is delayed or cancelled, your luggage is lost or you fall sick away from home?

"Travel insurance is very cheap relative to what it covers," the agency manager from Petaling Jaya points out.

WorldNomads.com offers good advice - always act as though you are uninsured! The popular online global travel insurance provider for independent and adventurous travellers covers residents in over 150 countries, including Malaysia.

It cautions prospective travellers that while "accidents happen, stupidity doesn't".

The latter and, of course, "extreme risks" such as trekking across the Arctic in a t-shirt, are obviously not covered.

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