Fencers Lim Wei Wen and Aloysius Low's mentors inspire them to win

Fencers Lim Wei Wen and Aloysius Low's mentors inspire them to win
National fencers Lim Wei Wen (right) and Aloysius Low in Singapore SEA Games Squad.

He has battled on the grand stage of an Asian Games, and emerged with a bronze medal.

Epee fencer Lim Wei Wen made history when he became the first Singaporean to win a fencing medal at the Incheon Games last year, but his triumph was marked by a tinge of sadness.

In 2012, former national coach Alexey Karpov (inset) succumbed to a heart attack, and the fact that he could not witness his student's feat meant Lim could not really celebrate.

Lim told The New Paper: "We would have had a big party to celebrate, and we would have hugged and cried.

"A part of this SEA (South-east Asia) Games, I will be competing for him."

The 30-year-old is a gold-medal hope for the Singapore fencing team at the 28th SEA Games here in June.

Lim credits Karpov for turning him into the fencer he is today.

The Russian first spotted Lim at a novice event here in 2006, just months after the former competitive gamer picked up the sport at ITE Balestier.

Lim recalled: "I was looking at this Caucasian guy and wondering why he seemed to be tracking me at the competition. I ignored him and finished in the top eight, which I was very satisfied about."

Karpov approached him after the event and invited Lim to be a sparring partner in the national team.

"I don't know why he believed in me, he said he wanted to train me to qualify for the SEA Games in 2007, and he wanted me to win the gold there," Lim said.

BIG HOPE

"I thought to myself, 'Siao (Hokkien for crazy) ah, coach', the SEA Games was a year away and all my seniors had fenced for more than 10 years already."

But the 1.80m-tall athlete hunkered down and trained hard under Karpov, who was once Russia's national coach, and made the team for the 2007 Games in Thailand.

Remarkably, Lim went on a fairytale run all the way to the final, where he was beaten by Vietnam's Do Huu Cuong in the men's individual epee.

Had he won, Lim would have become the first Singaporean man to win an individual fencing title at the SEA Games.

As the sport was not offered at the 2009 Games, the 2010 Commonwealth Fencing Championships silver medallist attempted to chase history at the 2011 Games in Indonesia, but faltered because of injury.

"Alex was no longer the national coach in 2011 but I wanted to get a gold at the SEA Games for him, but I hurt my ligament before my event," said Lim.

Subsequently, he hung up his fencing breeches for 18 months to take care of his sick grandparents, before returning in 2013 after being named in the first batch of athletes for the elite Sports Excellence Scholarship programme.

He has been training full-time since.

Lim leaves with the team tomorrow for a month-long training camp in South Korea.

When the Games starts, he will be out to thrill the home crown at the OCBC Arena at the Sports Hub.

Lim said: "I don't want to say, 'Oh, I want to win a gold for (Alexey)". Of course medals and results are good, but for me, what is more important is the attitude, not just of the sportsmen, but of the people here, too.

"This is the SEA Games in Singapore, this is my home, this is the right moment to showcase my country, my people, and how strong we are.

"When my supporters come to watch me fight they are not just spectators, they are also competing with me.

"Fencing may be a one-versus-one sport, but with supporters, it will be 100-versus-one. We are going to be the big bullies out there with home support."

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