Jeremy Lin hints brother could soon play in Taiwan

Jeremy Lin hints brother could soon play in Taiwan
Jeremy Lin has previously hinted in his Facebook page that the younger Lin could play basketball overseas without saying where.
PHOTO: Reuters

TAIPEI, Taiwan - Taiwanese-American National Basketball Association (NBA) player Jeremy Lin yesterday hinted that his younger brother is expected to play for Taiwan's Super Basketball League (SBL) next season.

In a recent post on his official Line account, Jeremy Lin posted a photograph he took with his younger brother Joseph Lin at a basketball court.

In the post written in Mandarin Chinese, the Charlotte Hornet point guard said he was working out for the last time with his younger brother before the latter flies to Taiwan.

"I feel extremely proud to see he worked so hard this summer," Lin said in his post.

The latest announcement is the first time Jeremy Lin made it clear that Joseph Lin could join Taiwan's top-tier semi-professional SBL in the next season.

Jeremy Lin has previously hinted in his Facebook page that the younger Lin could play basketball overseas without saying where.

Recently graduated from Hamilton College, located in Clinton, New York, this year, the 185-centimeter, 68-kilogram player played point guard position for his school's team.

According to statistics available at the Hamilton College website, the younger Lin played 72 games for Hamilton, 10 of them as a starting guard.

Hamilton competes at the NCAA Division-III level and its teams are members of the New England Small College Athletic Conference.

Lin left with an average of 4.4 points per game, 2 assists and 2 rebounds per game during his college career.

Joseph Lin previously visited Taiwan earlier this month and had met and practiced with three of the total seven SBL teams, namely Bank of Taiwan (台銀), Fubon Braves, and the Pure-Youth Construction, according to local media reports.

It was previously reported that Bank of Taiwan and Fubon Braves were more interested in recruiting Lin.

Each SBL team is entitled to have one foreign-born, ethnic-Taiwanese player on its roster without costing them an import roster spot.

Despite his American citizenship, both Lin's parents are from Taiwan, which makes him eligible as an ethnic Taiwanese player.

Hung Chun-cheng, head coach of the Bank of Taiwan previously told local media that his team has been in contact with Lin for some time.

"We are more than happy to recruit Lin as long as he is willing to do so," Hung said.

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