Bhutan's dark secret to happiness

Bhutan's dark secret to happiness

On a visit to Thimphu, the capital of Bhutan, I found myself sitting across from a man named Karma Ura, spilling my guts. Maybe it was the fact that he was named Karma, or the thin air, or the way travel melts my defences, but I decided to confess something very personal. Not that long before, seemingly out of the blue, I had experienced some disturbing symptoms: shortness of breath, dizziness, numbness in my hands and feet. At first, I feared I was having a heart attack, or going crazy. Maybe both. So I went to the doctor, who ran a series of tests and found...

"Nothing," said Ura. Even before I could complete my sentence, he knew that my fears were unfounded. I was not dying, at least not as quickly as I feared. I was having a panic attack.

What I wanted to know was: why now - my life was going uncharacteristically well - and what could I do about it?

"You need to think about death for five minutes every day," Ura replied. "It will cure you."

"How?" I said, dumbfounded.

"It is this thing, this fear of death, this fear of dying before we have accomplished what we want or seen our children grow. This is what is troubling you."

"But why would I want to think about something so depressing?"

"Rich people in the West, they have not touched dead bodies, fresh wounds, rotten things. This is a problem. This is the human condition. We have to be ready for the moment we cease to exist."

Places, like people, have a way of surprising us, provided we are open to the possibility of surprise and not weighed down with preconceived notions.

Read the full article here.

More about

bhutan
Purchase this article for republication.

BRANDINSIDER

SPONSORED

Most Read

Your daily good stuff - AsiaOne stories delivered straight to your inbox
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy policy and Terms and Conditions.