Famed Hungarian music academy gets new lease on life

Famed Hungarian music academy gets new lease on life
The reopened large concert hall of the Liszt Academy music school is seen in this general view taken in Budapest October 21, 2013. The music school founded by Franz Liszt, the first piano superstar, reopens its main concert hall on October 22, after a 40-million-euro ($54.7 million) refurbishment under an ambitious plan to give the 138-year-old institution, and its music study programme, a new lease on life. One of the world's cherished concert venues, the "Large Hall" in Budapest has been painstakingly restored during a four-year closure to its early 20th-century Art Deco style

BUDAPEST - The Liszt Academy music school founded by Franz Liszt, the first piano superstar, reopens its main concert hall on Tuesday refurbished under an ambitious plan to give the 138-year-old institution, and its music study programme, a new lease on life.

One of the world's cherished concert venues, where audience and performers alike praise the acoustics and say the spirit of musicians past seems to seep through the walls, the "Large Hall"in Budapest has been painstakingly restored during a four-year closure to its early 20th-century Art Deco style.

"The starting point was that this building is more than 100 years old and had never been renovated," said rector Andras Batta, 60, who will cede his post Nov. 1 to harpist Andrea Vigh.

"Practice rooms were shabby, heating was bad, there was no air conditioning, there were a lot of problems so I thought with such great music and immense possibilities we must grow, we must develop it as one of the 21st century's great concert halls."

Liszt was a renowned virtuoso pianist and one of the 19th century's great classical composers.

The reopening, on Liszt's birthday, will feature a gala concert attended by heads of music institutions from around the world and include remarks by Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban.

The reconstruction of the 1907 hall, where such greats as pianist Sviatoslav Richter, violinist Yehudi Menuhin and conductor Leonard Bernstein performed, is distinguished by ebony-hued wood panelling laced with white geometric decoration. It replaces a drab brown coating dating from communist times.

A new chamber opera house is named for the late Jewish conductor Sir Georg Solti, who fled Nazi-allied Hungary before World War Two. New "green rooms" for soloists and modern catering facilities are part of the 40-million-euro (S$68 million) overhaul.

The 800-plus students who used to take their classes at the building housing the concert hall have been accommodated at a new building a few blocks away, named for the late Hungarian avant-garde composer Gyorgy Ligeti.

While the older building has been a hive of construction work, the new one resounds to the glorious din of students playing in practice rooms. It lacks the storied atmosphere of the old, but for some students that is a plus.

"A lot of students were very happy when this building opened," Anasztazia Razvalyaeva, 27, a native Russian who is now a pupil of Vigh's, said while showing a visitor around.

"They said, 'At last, it feels like a real music academy, and not like such a place of mystery'."

That "place of mystery" looms large, however, in the Hungarian government's plans to push Budapest up the league tables of European cities with a reputation for music-making.

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