Bias against old age affects these dogs too

Bias against old age affects these dogs too
Together with other senior pets, Mack (showing its tongue) and Wave will be up for adoption at the Oldies Only Senior Pet Adoption Drive at *Scape Art Park, from noon till 6pm on Sunday.

OLDER pets are usually the last ones to be adopted, putting them first in line for euthanasia at overcrowded shelters.

The reason? Singaporeans believe that younger pets can be better trained and bonded with, according to a survey.

Out of the 109 families interviewed, only a mere 2 per cent were open to adopting pets above the age of six.

The survey was conducted by Old Is Gold, a communications campaign advocating adoption and better welfare for senior pets in Singapore.

The three main reasons respondents cited were that younger pets can be better trained and bonded with, older pets may die some time after adoption and that younger pets are cuter.

These were some of the reasons why older animals such as Mack, which is seven, has not found a home despite its friendly and affectionate temperament.

A viral attack wiped out the rest of Mack's litter, leaving it to be the sole survivor, along with its mother, Wave.

Mack and Wave, together with other senior pets, will be up for adoption during the Oldies Only Senior Pet Adoption Drive at *Scape Art Park, from noon till 6pm on Sunday.

Corporate consultant Andy Pe, 45, who adopted a 10-year-old labrador retriever three years ago, said it is not true that it is hard to bond with older dogs.

"Despite his age, Kobe is very cuddly and affectionate. He enjoys human affection and he expresses it through his licking. He will lie next to me whenever I watch TV," he told My Paper.

tanjeets@sph.com.sg


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