Charities go online to reach donors

Charities go online to reach donors
(From left) Lindsey Yan, chief executive officer of Cliquefund, Karin Aue, head of communication and Farzam Deed, chief technologist. Cliquefund lets people buy coupons to redeem products made by social enterprises, including one which helps blind potters here and another which generates income opportunities for under-privileged families – get access to crowdfunding. As online giving hits a record, charities are creating innovative ways for people to donate.

SINGAPORE- With Singaporeans more generous than ever when giving through online channels, charities have begun innovating to embrace the connected generation.

From clicking for coupons, to "liking" a Facebook page and tapping an ez-link card - charities are trying to reach out to donors through innovative platforms.

Last Friday, the Community Chest (ComChest) launched a campaign in which all it takes to donate is to tap an ez-link card on billboards in MRT stations.

In March, Singapore-based start-up CLLIKE revamped its website, via which participating firms donate US$1 (S$1.25) each time the start-up helps attract a "like" on their Facebook page.

Then in October, Cliquefund entered the scene to help social enterprises - including one which helps blind potters here and another which generates income opportunities for under-privileged families - get access to crowdfunding.

It lets people buy coupons to redeem products made by these enterprises, for instance. But these coupons can be redeemed only after a certain number are sold.

Cliquefund chief executive Lindsey Yan said the website aims to help social enterprises reach out to a wider audience. "When people share about the campaign and encourage others to buy coupons as well, this turns customers into advocates," she said.

Through the website's first successful campaign, social enterprise See-No-Clay reached its goal of selling 10 coupons, at $50 each, within two weeks. Each coupon can be used to commission small sculptures made by potters with visual disabilities.

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