It's getting hot in here

It's getting hot in here
Upper Seletar Reservoir. Singapore has been getting drier over the last 30 years, a study conducted by the National Environment Agency has revealed. Rainfall levels were above the long term average from 1901 to 1967 but have remained consistently below this average since. Experts attribute the trend to the effects of global warming and shifting weather patterns worldwide.

SINGAPORE-

1

WHAT IS HAPPENING TO THE WEATHER?

According to a new study, Singapore's rainfall has been getting less over the last 30 years and more extreme weather changes are predicted to hit the region. The long-term average rainfall has been 2,346mm per year.

Between 1907 and 1967, it was wetter - with around 80mm of rain more than average. But for the last 30 years, there has been less rainfall - 40mm less than average.

2

WHY IS THAT?

Some experts pointed to factors such as Singapore's rapid industrialisation during the 1970s to explain the pattern of decreasing rainfall. Said Professor Lim Hock, founding director of Temasek Laboratories: "The significant change in the landscape and ground cover condition of Singapore can affect the local distribution of clouds and rain, and hence the observed reduction in rainfall."

3

WHEN DID IT START GETTING DRYER?

The study looked at weather patterns over the last 100 years to see the bigger picture. For example, over the last 50 years, there were 169 wet days (where there is more than 0.2mm of rain) on average in Singapore each year, and temperature variations in the last half-century confirm a trend of temperatures rising more in the last 20 years.

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