This Ninja is way too fast

This Ninja is way too fast

You can travel from Singapore to Kuala Lumpur, which is about 350km away, in under an hour on this monster machine.

The latest sportsbike from Kawasaki, called Ninja H2R, is faster than a Formula One (F1) car.

And like F1 cars, the H2R is not allowed on roads even if you keep to the speed limits.

The supercharged 998cc, four-cylinder H2R has an eye-popping 300 horsepower and can hit speeds of 420kmh.

This makes it probably the fastest production motorcycle in the world, according to calculations made by motorcycle magazine Cycle World.

Street-legal superbikes are electronically limited to a top speed of about 300kmh under an agreement between Japanese and European manufacturers.

The H2R, launched at European motorcycle shows last month, is meant only for circuit use, a spokesman for local Kawasaki distributor Evershine Auto told The New Paper. It comes with slick tyres and does not have any mirrors, headlights, signal or brake lights.

But the H2R's 200hp supercharged sibling, the H2, is street legal.

The H2, which looks similar but is designed to meet emission and noise standards, costs about $40,000.

The carbon-fibre-infused H2R is said to be double the H2's price.

Said the spokesman: "We've received bookings and deposits from motorcycle dealers. All I can share is that the response for the H2 is good. Its estimated arrival is early March 2015.

"In my opinion, the technology found on the H2R and the H2 will be the future of motorcycling."

SUPERCHARGER

The technology was developed using Kawasaki's expertise in the aerospace and marine industries.

A supercharger increases and compresses the air reaching a motorcycle engine. With more air and fuel going into the combustion chamber, more power and torque can be generated.

Kawasaki's feat has earned it bragging rights, said the Singapore Motor Cycle Trade Association president Tony Yeo.

"Kawasaki has set a benchmark for the industry," Mr Yeo, 60, told TNP.

But such a powerful machine may be unrealistic for most riders, said Singapore Motorcycle Safety and Sports Club president Ong Kim Hua.

"Even with a 200hp motorcycle, the speed and acceleration is already beyond what most riders are capable of handling. You need electronic aids to harness and control the power of modern bikes," he added.

Motorcycles like the H2 and H2R, equipped with the latest traction control, anti-lock brake system, launch control and electronic steering damping, could give their European rivals a run for their money.

But their hefty price tags will appeal only to enthusiasts with deep pockets.

About 75 per cent of motorbikes registered in Singapore are "bread-and-butter" machines below 200cc.

But with motorbike certificate of entitlement premiums currently above $4,000, Mr Yeo said more riders are foregoing smaller machines for the big ones.

"We can expect this segment to grow even more when Japanese brands offer high-tech and high performance as stock items on their motorcycles," he added.

Even with a 200hp motorcycle, the speed and acceleration is already beyond what most riders are capable of handling. You need electronic aids to harness and control the power of modern bikes. - Mr Ong Kim Hua, the president of Singapore Motorcycle Safety and Sports Club

zaihan@sph.com.sg


This article was first published on Nov 27, 2014.
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