Offering prisoners ray of light and hope

Offering prisoners ray of light and hope
Reverend Timothy Khoo who joined the Prison Fellowship International (PFI) as a director of training in 1989, has gradually risen through the ranks of the organisation, which has special consultative status with the United Nations’ Economic and Social Council. He is recently appointed president and chief executive of PFI.

As a boy, Reverend Timothy Khoo used to help his family pack thousands of chocolate eggs and bars for prisoners every Easter and Christmas.

His inspiration was his grandfather - Singapore's first prison chaplain.

"He told us that the inmates... would feel especially lonely during holidays," said Rev Khoo, who was recently appointed president and chief executive of an organisation that aims to help inmates around the world.

"So he mobilised his own family to give them some hope and cheer.

"Even his dying breath... was to make sure the inmates from Changi Prison, where he was based, would be getting their presents and to make sure we remembered to care (for) and love them."

Rev Khoo, 48, has since dedicated 30 years of his life to the same ministry as his late grandfather, Reverend Khoo Siaw Hua, and late father, Reverend Henry Khoo.

But while their efforts were focused on helping prisoners in Singapore, his role has been an international one.

He joined the Prison Fellowship International (PFI) as a director of training in 1989 after completing his studies in psychology and theology at the Oral Roberts University in Oklahoma.

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