Sports Hub to run partly on solar power

Sports Hub to run partly on solar power
An artist's impression of solar panels that will be installed on the roof of the National Stadium at the Singapore Sports Hub.

THE Singapore Sports Hub will use solar energy to meet some of its electricity needs.

Solar panels will be installed on the new National Stadium's roof across an area of approximately 7,000sqm.

These will generate 707 kilowatts-peak (kWp) of electricity - enough to offset the energy used by the cooling system at the 55,000-seat National Stadium in Kallang, which is expected to be completed by April.

Its "bowl cooling" system will blow chilled air through holes in the tier below each seat to add to the comfort of spectators.

The panels will be constructed by solar energy company Phoenix Solar.

It has signed a 21-year solar energy purchase agreement with the Sports Hub, ensuring that the arena will have stable electricity prices throughout that period.

Singapore Sports Hub chief executive Philippe Collin Delavaud said opting for solar energy was "just the beginning" of the arena's plan to integrate "innovative technologies" into its operations.

Other stadiums that have gone "green" include the Kaohsiung National Stadium in Taiwan, which is fully powered by the sun.

Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, in the United States, has installed both solar panels and wind turbines to power the stadium entirely.

Major organisations here that have opted for solar power include the Housing Board (HDB) and supermarket chain Sheng Siong.

Last month, the HDB called its largest solar-leasing tender to date, for a company to own and operate panels on 125 blocks in Ang Mo Kio, Sengkang, Serangoon North and Buangkok.

These will produce enough electricity to power more than 1,000 four-room HDB flats.

Sheng Siong will be installing the largest single solar panel system in Singapore on its distribution centre in Mandai, while the Newater plant in Ulu Pandan has also begun installing panels.

davidee@sph.com.sg


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