Spreading the Yuletide joy

Spreading the Yuletide joy
St Anne's Church is all dressed up and ready for Christmas.

SINGAPORE- ST ANNE'S CHURCH: Let there be light

THE new leader of the Catholic Church, Archbishop William Goh, will deliver his first Christmas homily tonight, at St Anne's Church in Sengkang.

It is a big moment and for the first time, the church is all decked out in bright lights instead of subdued lighting. Its facade and perimeter are lined with 75,000 blue and white LED Christmas lights, suffusing the single-storey building in a wintry glow.

Amid the sparkle are more than 20 figurines scattered at the perimeter to portray the nativity scene. The special light-up, which also marks the church's 50th anniversary, took a month to produce, said Mr Christopher Edward Lim, who led the project's three-man team. "It was very challenging but luckily, we're good with our hands," said the 48-year-old with a laugh.

The team spent about $16,000 on the project, way below the $50,000 Mr Lim estimates it could have cost if contractors had been engaged.

The lights, which went up on Nov 30, will stay up till end-January. They are turned on from 7pm to 10pm, but tonight, they will be ablaze till 2am to greet parishioners at midnight mass.

TRINITY CHRISTIAN CENTRE: A head-turner

WITH 90 cast and crew members, all volunteers, Trinity Christian Centre is giving a fresh spin - literally - to that old favourite: Once Upon A Star.

A massive two-storey revolving stage was built for the show about the birth of Jesus Christ.

"Building it was tricky," said Pastor Janice Chng, the spokesman for the Paya Lebar church. "It's rotated by volunteers so we had to make sure the dimensions and mechanisms could take the weight of the set and were safe to manoeuvre."

The set was designed by one of the volunteers, an architect, and built by stage set production firms hired by the church. A dance segment features the silhouettes of dancers, projected on a screen. It is one of the most technically complicated parts of the show.

"It requires a lot of concentration. It's much more than just shining a spotlight onto the screen and having people dance in front of it," said the pastor.

Several trials were carried out from September to decide on the types and angles of light sources to give the best effect, she added.

Tonight is the last performance of the hour-long show, which starts at 8pm. Admission is free.

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