Aussie gangster Chopper makes gory final confessions

Aussie gangster Chopper makes gory final confessions
Read denied feeling any remorse and said he felt 'nothing at all' during the killings.

SYDNEY - Notorious Australian crime figure-turned-author Mark "Chopper" Read offered a callous confession to four murders, including two unsolved cases, in his final interview just weeks before dying from cancer.

Read, who shot to international fame after the 2000 film "Chopper" starring Eric Bana was made about his violent life, spent 23 years in jail but was never convicted of murder - despite claiming over the years to have been involved in the killing of 19 people.

In a tell-all interview with Australian current affairs programme 60 Minutes screened on Sunday night, the career criminal claimed to have carried out four murders, saying he was determined to set the record straight.

The confession was recorded just 16 days before his death earlier this month from liver cancer.

"This is the last interview, the last picture show," said Read, who found fame in Australia after swapping his life of crime for novel-writing, including 1993's "How to Shoot Friends and Influence People".

"Four, that's all you're getting, that's it. I haven't killed any more than that so don't try to make out that I have," he said.

In a candid, often glib, recounting of the murders - three shootings and the hanging of a child-killer in his jail cell - Read denied feeling any remorse and said he felt "nothing at all" during the killings.

Among his alleged victims were two unsolved murders - the shooting of influential union member Desmond Costello outside a Melbourne hotel in 1971 and the death of Sydney Collins, national president of the Outlaws motorcycle gang who has been missing since 2002.

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