Early morning dance parties take off in US

Early morning dance parties take off in US

LOS ANGELES - Partying before breakfast? It's not everyone's cup of tea. But it is the concept behind "Daybreakers," early-morning raves becoming increasingly popular in the United States.

At 6.30 am one recent morning, some 250 young - and old - dance enthusiasts gathered in downtown Los Angeles to strut their stuff before many people have even got out of bed.

Andre Herd, the producer behind the event, said it combines the fun of night-time partying without the morning-after downsides.

"It flips the switch on what everyone knows and used to love in my opinion, which is: you go, you get drunk, you maybe meet somebody, you hook up, you have fun with your friends, you go home, you're hungover the next day," he told AFP.

"Here you get to go dance, you can meet somebody, there is an amazing energy in the room. Because everyone comes here buys a ticket and comes with the intention of dancing, everyone dances." The parties are held about once a month, with tickets costing $25 and invitations sent out by email about a week in advance.

But unlike a regular rave, there is no alcohol or drugs: the strongest stimulant available in Los Angeles is coffee, with fruit juices the drink of choice at the bar.

There is, of course, a DJ to keep the rhythms coming.

Lenore, whose friends are all married and who no longer goes out to clubs at night, said Daybreakers were ideal.

"I love clubs and now I am over them, this is just like a good way for me to go out and get hot and sweaty and not have to wear stupid shoes and dress like a whore," she said.

Frank, a 60-something who won't give his exact age, added: "I have done this twice, I just like to dance, usually mostly by myself or standing dance sometimes, I just love it, I can't keep my feet still." Originally launched in New York, breakfast parties are now organised regularly in several US cities - but also in London and Tel Aviv.

In Los Angeles, the gathering breaks up around 9:00 am - when many head off for work or play, a smile on their faces.

"I'll take my computer down to the beach and answer some emails, pick my daughter up from school at noon, teach a garden lesson for her class from noon to one," said Tawnya Calvillo, after her vigorous party workout.

"After that, we'll probably eat ice cream and go for a bike ride."

 

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