Massive manhunt for killers in French magazine massacre

Massive manhunt for killers in French magazine massacre

PARIS - French security forces on Thursday launched a massive manhunt for two brothers suspected of killing 12 people in an Islamist attack on a satirical weekly in Paris, the deadliest attack in France in half a century.

The attack triggered an international outpouring of solidarity, with demonstrations spreading from Moscow to Washington, as world leaders and other media including newspaper cartoonists united in their revulsion of the daylight assault.

More than 100,000 people took to the streets across France to express their outrage, many carrying banners reading: "I am Charlie" while the hashtag #JeSuisCharlie was trending worldwide.

President Francois Hollande called the massacre - thought to be the worst attack on French soil since 1961 - "an act of exceptional barbarity" and "undoubtedly a terrorist attack".

In the hunt for the attackers, police published pictures of the wanted men in an urgent appeal for information as a manhunt stretched long into the night with a raid by elite anti-terror police in the northern city of Reims.

An 18-year-old suspected of being an accomplice in the attack at the headquarters of the Charlie Hebdo magazine was taken into custody after surrendering to police in a small town in the same region as Reims.

A source close to the case said Hamyd Mourad surrendered after "seeing his name circulating on social media".

But the masked, black-clad gunmen - who shouted "Allahu akbar" while killing some of France's most outspoken journalists as well as two policemen - were still on the loose.

Arrest warrants had been issued for Cherif Kouachi, 32, a known jihadist convicted in 2008 for involvement in a network sending fighters to Iraq, and his 34-year-old brother Said. Both were born in Paris.

Search-and-seizure operations took place in Strasbourg and towns near Paris, while in Reims police commandos carried out a raid on a building later scoured by white-clad forensic police.

Day of mourning

Flags were to fly at half-mast Thursday as Hollande declared a day of national mourning - only the fifth of the past 50 years.

"Nothing can divide us, nothing should separate us. Freedom will always be stronger than barbarity," said the president.

The attack saw the gunmen storm the offices of Charlie Hebdo in broad daylight as journalists gathered for a morning editorial conference, killing eight journalists, including some of France's best-known cartoonists.

Charlie Hebdo has long provoked controversy, mocking many religions with provocative drawings, a practice that has outraged Muslims whose religion forbids depictions of the Prophet Mohammed.

Even before the attack France was on high alert like many European capitals that have seen citizens leave to fight alongside the radical Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria.

The group has singled out France, which is home to Europe's largest Muslim population, when calling for terrorist attacks against Western nations.

Hollande called for "national unity", adding that "several terrorist attacks had been foiled in recent weeks".

US President Barack Obama led the global condemnation of what he called a "cowardly, evil" assault. Pope Francis described it as a "horrible attack" saying such violence, "whatever the motivation, is abominable, it is never justified".

Security experts said the calculated and deadly efficacy of the killers showed they were highly-trained.

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