Snowden declares 'mission accomplished' on leaks

Snowden declares 'mission accomplished' on leaks

LONDON - Rogue American intelligence analyst Edward Snowden has declared his "mission accomplished" after unveiling huge US surveillance programmes, but urged citizens to insist their governments stop spying on them.

In excerpts of his first major media appearance since claiming asylum in Russia - which will be broadcast on British television on Christmas Day - Snowden issued a staunch defence of individual privacy.

"Together we can find a better balance, end mass surveillance and remind the government that if it really wants to know how we feel, asking is always cheaper than spying," he says in extracts released by Britain's Channel 4.

The former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor sent shockwaves around the world by revealing the extent of Washington's electronic eavesdropping.

The short, pre-recorded broadcast will be his first television appearance since arriving in Moscow in June.

The 30-year-old has also given his first in-person interview since claiming asylum, telling Tuesday's Washington Post: "I already won.

"For me, in terms of personal satisfaction, the mission's already accomplished," he said.

"As soon as the journalists were able to work, everything that I had been trying to do was validated," he added.

"Because, remember, I didn't want to change society. I wanted to give society a chance to determine if it should change itself."

Snowden leaked explosive details of the secret surveillance schemes to media including the Washington Post and Britain's Guardian, and has fled the United States to avoid prosecution.

He arrived in Russia in June as a fugitive and spent more than a month holed up in a Moscow airport before being granted a year's asylum.

US federal prosecutors have filed a criminal complaint against him, charging him with espionage and felony theft of government property.

His leaks have deeply embarrassed President Barack Obama's administration by revealing the massive scale of America's spying efforts, including on the country's own allies such as German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

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