US conservatives: ‘We lost’ but debt-ceiling fight worth it

US conservatives: ‘We lost’ but debt-ceiling fight worth it

WASHINGTON - Adrift but unbowed, dyed-in-the-wool conservatives sifted through the ashes of their Republican Party's capitulation, insisting their failed fight over Obamacare was worth flirting with US economic disaster.

The Thursday morning after their legislative defeat promises a political hangover for many Tea Party-backed Republicans in the House of Representatives.

Their strategy of standing against President Barack Obama's landmark health care law during a fiscal crisis yielded little except a two-week government shutdown, a near default on US debt, tanking poll numbers and an internal battle that has alienated moderates and set the direction of the party itself into question.

"We lost today," Republican congressman Mick Mulvaney acknowledged as he strode through the basement of the US Capitol, where weakened Speaker John Boehner had convened his caucus to break the news that Wednesday's deal to avert default would only minimally nick "Obamacare."

But "if folks think we're done fighting about spending, debts, deficit, Obamacare, religious liberties (and) equal protection, they're wrong."

He wasn't the only undaunted Republican.

"We fought the right fight," it was "absolutely worth it," proclaimed congresswoman Michele Bachmann, who launched the House's Tea Party caucus in 2010.

Bachmann and others link their crusade against Obamacare to a demand for dramatically reduced federal spending, saying the monstrous US debt - currently at US$16.7 trillion (S$20.75 trillion) and counting - will only drag down the nation's economy.

And by giving in on the debt-ceiling fight, some argued it will be tougher for hardliners to press their case in future budget battles, including one expected to consume Washington later this year when Democrats will want to remove automatic spending cuts favoured by many Republicans.

"Because we capitulated on this one, we blinked... I think we have less credibility going into the next" fiscal fights, said congressman Thomas Massie.

Purchase this article for republication.

BRANDINSIDER

SPONSORED

Most Read

Your daily good stuff - AsiaOne stories delivered straight to your inbox
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy policy and Terms and Conditions.