US vows 'relentless' terror fight after Somalia, Libya raids

US vows 'relentless' terror fight after Somalia, Libya raids

WASHINGTON - The United States pledged on Sunday to keep "relentless pressure" on terror groups following the daring capture of an Al-Qaeda operative in Libya and the storming of a Shebab stronghold in Somalia.

The tough talk from Washington, however, was met with questions in Tripoli, where officials demanded answers about the "kidnap" on Saturday of Abu Anas al-Libi, who was indicted in connection with the 1998 bombings of US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.

A US official told AFP that Libi, who was on the FBI's most wanted list with a $5 million bounty on his head, was taken to a US Navy warship in the region and was being questioned there.

Somalia was more welcoming of the US Navy SEAL raid that took place on the same day thousands of miles away in the southern port of Barawe. Prime Minister Abdi Farah Shirdon said cooperation with foreign partners in the fight on terror was "no secret."

The success of that assault on the beachfront villa of a leader of Somalia's Al-Qaeda-linked insurgents was still unclear, with the fate of the target uncertain.

It came after last month's siege of an upscale shopping mall in the Kenyan capital Nairobi that left 67 people dead.

Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel said the operations sent "a strong message to the world that the United States will spare no effort to hold terrorists accountable."

"We will continue to maintain relentless pressure on terrorist groups that threaten our people or our interests, and we will conduct direct action against them, if necessary, that is consistent with our laws and our values," he added.

Secretary of State John Kerry, speaking in Indonesia, said the United States would "never stop" in its battle on terror.

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