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80 percent of Greeks fear social unrest
Fri, Jun 11, 2010
AFP

ATHENS, GREECE - As many as 80 percent of Greeks fear the economic troubles in the country could trigger social unrest, according to an opinion poll published Friday in Greek newspaper Kathimerini.

And the poll showed little optimism for the days ahead, with 69 percent expecting the economic situation to get worse and only 12 percent expecting it to get better.

Last month, Athens agreed a rescue package worth 110 billion euros (US$133 billion) with the European Union and International Monetary Fund to cover its debt obligations, on condition of a string of austerity measures to reduce
spending.

According to the poll, carried out by think tank Public Issue surveying 1,019 people between June 2-7, 72 percent thought the economy was "going in the wrong direction".

Despite the negative mood, approval of the left-wing Pasok party, in power since October 2009 and the architect of the austerity measures, was at 45 percent against 27 percent for conservative opposition, New Democracy.

The prime minister and president of Pasok, Georgios Papandreou, was considered by 41 percent as the man most capable of leading the country, against opposition leader Antonis Samaras who received 18 percent.

However 40 percent lacked confidence in either leader.

Papandreou remains the most popular politician in the country (53 percent), followed by Samaras (44 percent).

Both have seen their popularity drop by more than 10 points over the past two months. --AFP

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