Myanmar rebuffs Malaysia for organizing OIC meeting on Rohingya

YANGON - Myanmar rebuffed Malaysia on Saturday for organising a meeting of Muslim governments to put pressure on Myanamar over the plight of Rohingya Muslims following a military crackdown that sent at least 66,000 people fleeing to Bangladesh.

Hosting a meeting of representatives from the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation on Thursday, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak called on Myanmar to stop attacking, and discriminating against the Rohingya minority.

Najib urged the OIC, which groups 57 Muslim nations, to act to end the unfolding "humanitarian tragedy".

In response, Myanmar, a mostly Buddhist country, said it was"regrettable" that Malaysia had called the meeting, and accused Kuala Lumpur of exploiting the crisis "to promote a certain political agenda" and disregard for the government's efforts to address it.

"The Government has been endeavouring to safeguard lives and ensure the security of the people from the violent attacks of new extremists," said Myanmar's Ministry of Foreign Affairs in a statement printed in the country's state-run daily, the Global New Light of Myanmar.

The ministry is run by Nobel Peace Prize winner and de facto leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, who won 2015 elections in a landslide after decades of pro-democracy struggle, ushering in Myanmar's first civilian government for about half a century.

Pressure on Myanmar over abuses of Rohingya minority in Rakhine

  • n this photograph taken on September 7, 2016, a minority Muslim Rohingya woman wearing traditional facial paste is seen at the Thet Kal Pyin displacement camp in Sittwe after the Rakhine State has been effectively split on religious grounds between Buddhists and Muslims since bouts of communal violence tore through the state in 2012, killing scores and forcing tens of thousands to flee.
  • Armed Myanmar border police scan the area during a patrol along the river dividing Myanmar and Bangladesh border located in Maungdaw, Rakhine State on October 15, 2016.
  • Rohingya Muslim men stand at U Shey Kya village outside Maugndaw in Rakhine state, Myanmar October 27, 2016.
  • Protesters shout slogans during a rally against former U.N. chief Kofi Annan in Sittwe, Myanmar, September 6, 2016. Annan arrived for a meeting with local officials and Muslim representatives to find a lasting solution to Myanmar's stateless Rohingya Muslims.
  • A group of Myanmar Buddhist monks wait for the arrival of former UN secretary general Kofi Annan during a visit in Sittwe on September 6, 2016, to preside over a meeting of the multisector advisory commission on Rakhine State to find lasting solution to Myanmar's stateless Rohingya Muslims.
  • Former UN secretary general Kofi Annan (background 3rd R), accompanied by multi-sector advisory commission on Rakhine State officials, holds a dialogue with Buddhist monks in Sittwe on September 6, 2016. Annan arrived for a meeting with local officials and Muslim representatives to find a lasting solution to Myanmar's stateless Rohingya Muslims.
  • A Rohingya Muslim elder (centre L, in white) speaks while others listen during a meeting with former UN secretary general Kofi Annan (not pictured) while a policeman (R) takes notes at Thet Kay Pyin camp for displaced Rohingya families in Sittwe on September 7, 2016.
  • Rohingya Muslims gather at Thet Kay Pyin camp during a visit by former UN secretary general Kofi Annan (not pictured) at the camp for displaced Rohingya families in Sittwe on September 7, 2016. Annan is leading the multi-sector advisory commission on Rakhine State to find a lasting solution to Myanmar's stateless Rohingya Muslims.
  • In this photograph taken on September 7, 2016, a minority Muslim Rohingya child wearing traditional facial paste is seen in a shelter at the Thet Kal Pyin displacement camp in Sittwe after the Rakhine State has been effectively split on religious grounds between Buddhists and Muslims since bouts of communal violence tore through the state in 2012, killing scores and forcing tens of thousands to flee.
  • Allegations that Myanmar soldiers are killing, raping and torturing villagers in Rakhine, a restive region that is home to the persecuted Muslim Rohingya, must be independently investigated, rights groups said.
  • Northern Rakhine has been under a military lockdown since an attack on border guards three weeks ago left nine policeman dead.
  • The government has blamed the raids on Rohingya militants and a search for the culprits has seen more than 30 people killed and dozens arrested, according to official reports.
  • Stories of grave abuse by security officers - including sexual violence, summary executions and the torching of villages - have spiralled on social media but are difficult to verify with the army barring rights groups and journalists from the remote region bordering Bangladesh.
  • On Friday Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch joined calls for an impartial investigation into the allegations, which the UN has called "alarming and unacceptable".
  • "If Myanmar's security forces are not involved in any human rights violations as the authorities claim, then they should have no trouble granting independent observers access," said Rafendi Djamin, Amnesty's Southeast Asia and Pacific director.
  • Writing on Facebook Friday, government spokesman Zaw Htay dismissed an article in the Myanmar Times that described reports of a "mass rape" in a Rohingya village on October 19.
  • "There was information that some attackers were kept in that village. So security was taken very seriously and (the search team) was very careful about being safe and would not think to rape up to 5 women," he wrote.
  • The government says the October 9 border raids were carried out by hundreds of Rohingya fighters linked to Taliban-trained Islamists.
  • If true, it would mark a troubling development in a religiously-split region where the stateless Rohingya have languished under years of repression but so far shown little interest in jihadist ideology.
  • Rakhine has sizzled with tension ever since waves of communal violence in 2012 killed more than 100 and pushed tens of thousands of people, mostly Rohingya, into destitute displacement camps.
  • Many in Buddhist-majority Myanmar insist the Rohingya are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh and viscerally oppose any moves to grant them citizenship.
  • The recent upsurge in violence deepens and complicates a conflict that already posed a top challenge to a new civilian government led by Aung San Suu Kyi, who has disappointed rights groups by not coming out in stronger support of the Rohingya.
  • In this handout photograph released by the Myanmar Armed Forces on October 14, 2016, Myanmar Air Force air force personel evacuate teachers and civil servants with a military helicopter from Maungdaw in Rakhine State on October 13, 2016.
  • Rohingya Muslim boys stand at U Shey Kya village outside Maugndaw in Rakhine state
  • Men walk at a Rohingya village outside Maugndaw in Rakhine state
  • Rakhine Buddhists who fled from recent violence in Maungdaw pass their time in a temporary shelter at a stadium in Sittwe, Myanmar, October 25, 2016.
  • In this photo taken on October 15, 2016, armed Myanmar border guard patrol the border area along the river dividing Myanmar and Bangladesh located in Maungdaw, Rakhine State following attacks that killed nine border police. The government says the October 9 border raids were carried out by hundreds of Rohingya fighters linked to Taliban-trained Islamists. Rights groups are piling pressure on Myanmar to allow an impartial probe into allegations that soldiers are killing, raping and torturing villagers in a security crackdown in Rakhine, a restive region home to the persecuted Muslim Rohingya.

Myanmar authorities say the military launched a security sweep in response to what they say was an attack in October by Rohingya insurgents on border posts near Myanmar's border with Bangladesh in which nine police officers were killed.

Since then, at least 86 people have been killed and the United Nations says at least 66,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh.

Residents and refugees accuse the military of killing, raping and detaining civilians while burning villages in northwestern Rakhine State.

The government denies the accusations and insists a lawful counter-insurgency operation is underway.

About 56,000 Rohingya live in Malaysia having fled unrest and persecution in Myanmar.

Kuala Lumpur summoned Myanmar's ambassador last year to protest against the treatment of Rohingya, breaking a tradition of non-intervention by members of the Association of South East Asian Nations in each other's affairs.

Najib said it would be a disgrace if the Southeast Asian group did not do its utmost to "avert the catastrophe that has been unfolding".

On Friday, a United Nations human rights investigator criticized Myanmar's operation and urged the military to respect the law and human rights.