Park Geun-Hye has left presidential Blue House but her 9 dogs have not

PHOTO: Reuters

SEOUL - A South Korean animal rights group has filed a complaint with police against former president Park Geun-hye for abandoning nine pet dogs in the presidential Blue House after being dismissed from office.

The dogs are Jindos, a Korean breed of hunting dog known for their loyalty.

Park left the Blue House presidential complex on Sunday, two days after the Constitutional Court dismissed her from office over a corruption scandal involving big business and financial favors.

She returned to her private home in the upmarket Gangnam district of the capital, Seoul.

Some neighbours there had given Park a pair of Jindos in early 2013, when she left for the Blue House. The pair had seven puppies in January this year.

The Busan Korea Alliance for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals said on its Twitter account it had filed a complaint against Park on a charge of animal abandonment.

The Blue House confirmed that Park had left the dogs there but denied they had been abandoned.

"She told Blue House staff to take good care of the dogs and to find good foster homes for the puppies if necessary," said a Blue House spokesman, Kim Dong Jo.

Another animal rights group, Coexistence of Animal Rights on Earth, said it was willing to care for the animals and find them homes.

"We want to help these dogs so that they won't be adopted thoughtlessly or end up in dog shelters," the group said in a statement.

The Jindos are native to Jindo Island off the southwest coast of the Korean peninsula.

S Korea President Park Geun-hye may have undergone various anti-aging medical procedures


The ‘female Rasputin’ at centre of S Korean President Park Geun-Hye political scandal

  • South Korean President Park Geun-Hye is facing calls to resign over allegations she allowed a close personal friend to meddle in state affairs.
  • People watch a television news report showing South Korean President Park Geun-Hye making a public apology, at a railway station in Seoul on October 25, 2016.
  • South Korean President Park Geun-hye bows after releasing a statement of apology to the public during a news conference at the Presidential Blue House in Seoul, South Korea, October 25, 2016.
  • South Korea’s presidential office said on Saturday it was cooperating with prosecutors’investigation into key aides to President Park Geun-hye over allegations an old friend of hers enjoyed inappropriate influence over her.
  • Prosecutors’ request for presidential Blue House documents came ahead of an evening protest expected to draw thousands in central Seoul calling for Park’s resignation amid a scandal that has cast her presidency into crisis.
  • A woman attends a protest denouncing President Park Geun-hye over a recent influence-peddling scandal in central Seoul
  • Protestors hang a caricature showing South Korean President Park Geun-Hye (L) and her confidante Choi Soon-Sil (C), on a board during a rally denouncing a scandal over President Park's aide in Seoul on October 27, 2016.
  • South Korean prosecutors on October 27 set up a high-powered "task-force" to probe a widening scandal involving alleged influence-peddling by a close confidante of President Park Geun-Hye. Choi Soon-Sil, an enigmatic woman with no government position, was already part of an investigation into allegations that she used her relationship with the president to strong-arm conglomerates into multi-million dollar donations to two non-profit foundations.
  • Park’s office said late on Friday she had ordered her senior secretaries to tender their resignations, and she will reshuffle the office in the near future. Her chief of staff separately offered to resign earlier, the office said.
  • The deepening crisis over allegations that Park’s friend, Choi Soon-sil, enjoyed inappropriate influence over her has sent her public support to an all-time low, with more than 40 percent in an opinion poll saying Park should resign or be impeached.

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