The hole house

The hole house

HAD the Phua family painted their home a pale shade of yellow, it would resemble a block of Emmental cheese. Instead, they decided to stick to a safer colour - white.

The hole house

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    HAD the Phua family painted their home a pale shade of yellow, it would resemble a block of Emmental cheese. Instead, they decided to stick to a safer colour - white.

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    The Phuas were previously living in a two-bedroom apartment, but moved into this bigger place to accommodate a growing family.

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    Once you're inside, you can see that the holes serve a purpose as windows and skylights that let natural light into the master bathroom, and along a stairway leading to the study on the top floor.

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    To cope with the need for extra space, the architects expanded the home sideways and upwards, by building an additional floor, turning it into a two-and-half storey home.

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    The house appears to glow at night, with light coming out from the inside.

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    The layout is kept simple,

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    The bookshelf leading to the study, is filled with children's DVDs and board games.

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    The bright and airy feel of the home continues downstairs.

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    On the left is the living area and the right, the dining area. In between, there is a floor to ceiling cabinet cum TV console that separates the two areas.

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    This bedroom is the family's favourite area.

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    That stuffy feeling of living in a landed home is gone, with the installation of sliding doors all around. But by having the sliding doors enclosed in wooden frames rather than steel ones, the home has a more cosy feel to it.

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    The couple chose to rely on artwork to jazz up their home. They selected pieces that had vibrant colours, such as red and orange, such as on two artworks that they bought in Vietnam.

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    On another wall, is a colourful wall sculpture of butterflies by Israeli artist David Gerstein. The couple had seen the piece some years ago, but didn't buy it then.

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Still, the home has been nicknamed The Hole House by its architects from Farm.

The semi-detached house, off Holland Road, certainly lives up to its nickname.

From the outside, it looks like someone randomly punched out squarish holes in the front and side walls of the houses.

Once you're inside, you can see that the holes serve a purpose as windows and skylights that let natural light into the master bathroom, and along a stairway leading to the study on the top floor.

"We wanted the house to have a light and airy feel with plenty of sunlight streaming in," says Max Phua, executive director at World Scientific Publishing.

The house appears to glow at night, with light coming out from the inside.

The Phuas were previously living in a two-bedroom apartment, but moved into this bigger place to accommodate a growing family.

To cope with the need for extra space, the architects expanded the home sideways and upwards, by building an additional floor, turning it into a two-and-half storey home.

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