Home base

Home base

LIKE most business travellers, Yoh-Chie Lu would stay in a hotel whenever he came to Singapore for work. Unlike other travellers, he did that for over 30 years.

A home for the traveller

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    LIKE most business travellers, Yoh-Chie Lu would stay in a hotel whenever he came to Singapore for work. Unlike other travellers, he did that for over 30 years.

  • Open gallery

    Finally, the chairman of heart stent-maker Biosensors International has decided he's had enough of living out of a suitcase.

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    His wife, Kimino, and their two younger daughters, Raena and Yuka, live in the United States, and visit at Christmas. Eldest daughter, Julie, who manages her father's investments and assets, lives with him in Singapore.

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    The family knew what kind of home they wanted to have: not a bungalow because that would require high maintenance, but

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    Out on the balcony, Mr Teo created a Zen-like garden with a small water feature at the edge, complete with stepping stones and bonsai plants.

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    Their home in Singapore is a four-bedroom apartment in Nassim Road. Apart from the US, the family also has a home in Japan.

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    Dark wooden panels by the main door create an intimate reception area. In contrast, the dining and living areas of the apartment are bright and airy, with sunlight streaming in through a row of glass doors.

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    The dining table is fairly large, perfect for when the whole family is around. It also doubles as a boardroom table is Mr Lu needs to hold a meeting at home.

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    Mr Teo kept the apartment's colour palette neutral so that the apartment would still look stylish many years down the road. Shades of beige, white and khaki-browns fill the rooms.

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    To maximise the space, Mr Teo designed a table to fit over the bay window, so that the space can be used as a desk. He also designed for the side console to be lower than usual.

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    An installation by American artist David Datuna hangs on the wall. Part of the Viewpoints of Million series, from afar it is a picture of the American flag, but up close the installation depicts things that symbolise the US.

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    Over on another wall, hangs a painting of Mount Fuji, by Tamako Kataoka, who is known for drawing the Japanese icon.



Finally, the chairman of heart stent-maker Biosensors International has decided he's had enough of living out of a suitcase.

"I am spending more time in Singapore and with a permanent base, my family can come visit too," he says.

His wife, Kimino, and their two younger daughters, Raena and Yuka, live in the United States, and visit at Christmas. Eldest daughter, Julie, who manages her father's investments and assets, lives with him in Singapore.

The family knew what kind of home they wanted to have: not a bungalow because that would require high maintenance, but "something cosy and easier to maintain that would suit our living style," says Mr Lu.

Whereas he would spend about three weeks each time in Singapore, now he stays for "months", spending half the year here.

Their home in Singapore is a four-bedroom apartment in Nassim Road. Apart from the US, the family also has a home in Japan.

"At the end of the day, it is more comfortable to come home and sink into your favourite chair, instead of facing the four walls of a hotel room," says Mr Lu.

Roy Teo, founder of The Mill, a group of interior design companies was brought in to turn the apartment into a home. The look is contemporary, and yet soothing.

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