Original video of boss slapping worker removed

Original video of boss slapping worker removed

SINGAPORE - A viral video showing an office worker being repeatedly slapped by an older colleague has been taken down from YouTube, where it was first uploaded on Friday.

Abusive boss punched, pushed, slapped intern

  • Open gallery

    An IT company manager who carried out a campaign of abuse against an intern was yesterday sentenced to a 10-day short detention order.

  • Open gallery

    The community sentence is served in prison, but carries no criminal record.

  • Open gallery

    A judge said that Lee Yew Nam, 45, the manager of Encore eServices, had used 32-year-old Calvin Chan Meng Hock like a "punching bag" - slapping and hitting him during a string of violent outbursts when he felt his work was not up to standard.

  • Open gallery

    He was caught when another intern took a 17-second video of him hitting Mr Chan, and posted it online.

  • Open gallery

    Lee was convicted of four charges of causing hurt to Mr Chan at his Jurong Town Hall Road office between January and May 2013.

  • Open gallery

    Two other charges of causing hurt and using abusive words were considered in sentencing.

  • Open gallery

    The victim.

  • Open gallery

    The victim speaking to a reporter.

  • Open gallery

    A relative of the victim speaking to a reporter.

  • Open gallery

    The family had previously asked for $100,000 in compensation.

  • Open gallery

    The court was told that in January 2013, Lee slapped Mr Chan once in the face for failing to neatly arrange several software files in a computer.

  • Open gallery

    The following month, he punched Mr Chan in the face several times, then pushed him off his chair, as he believed the intern had failed to correctly answer a customer's request.

  • Open gallery

    On May 14, 2013, Lee grabbed Mr Chan's chin and forcefully pulled it back after finding out he had forgotten to delete files from a database.

  • Open gallery

    The abuse that was caught on camera took place the next day, after Lee went through a conversation log between Mr Chan and a customer.

  • Open gallery

    Some netizens who are more sceptical have pointed out that it is unlikely for a person to remain quiet while being attacked.

  • Open gallery

    Lee felt Mr Chan had failed to perform his work well, and questioned him. When Mr Chan gave him an explanation deemed unsatisfactory, he became increasingly agitated and started to shout at the younger man. Lee then punched him in the head before slapping him three times.

  • Open gallery

    In passing sentence, District Judge Lim Tse Haw said the 10-day SDO imposed would be sufficient to deter like-minded employers from laying their hands on their employees.

  • Open gallery

    He said in a description put up with the original post: "I had just started an internship and noticed my supervisor constantly bullying my co-worker in the workplace.

  • Open gallery

    "A strong message must be conveyed to all employers that such brutish behaviour has no place in our civilised society," he said.

  • Open gallery

    "It must be made clear to all employers that an employee, no matter how low his position in the company is, is an important member of the company and not a punching bag, not even for stressed-out employers."

  • Open gallery

    The judge considered Lee's clean record, his plea of guilt, albeit at a late stage on the first day of his trial, his $5,000 voluntary compensation and the fact that he was suffering from a depressive disorder.

  • Open gallery

    However, he said he could not ignore the fact that what Lee had done was a serious matter. "As a responsible employer, he has a duty to have regard for the well-being and welfare of his employees.

  • Open gallery

    "Instead, he subjected the victim to physical hurt and verbal abuse on numerous occasions, once in 2010/2011, and five other occasions from January to May of 2013."

  • Open gallery

    Lee's lawyer Diana Ngiam successfully applied for her client to start his sentence on April 8. The maximum penalty for causing hurt is two years in jail and a $5,000 fine.

  • Open gallery

    A special hearing was held earlier this year to determine IT company manager Lee Yew Nam's sentence after he was convicted of four charges of physically abusing a subordinate several times in 2013.

  • Open gallery

    The defence asserted that the 45-year-old was suffering from a major depressive disorder at the time, and that it contributed to his offending behaviour.

The video, which was supposedly filmed by an intern at a local firm, has outraged many netizens.

In the video, an older man can be seen hitting an employee on the head. A colleague persuades him to calm down but he continues with three repeated slaps on the younger man's face.

The victim remains quiet throughout the abuse.

Some netizens who are more sceptical have pointed out that it is unlikely for a person to remain quiet while being attacked.

Nonetheless, many are taken aback by how hard the slaps appear to be.

6 lines your boss should never cross

  • Open gallery

    Salaries and bonuses are private and confidential information; your colleagues do not know how much you're paid.

  • Open gallery

    If your boss accidentally reveals such information, it can lead to resentment, envy or other forms of negative emotions among colleagues.

  • Open gallery

    This is a form of workplace abuse.

  • Open gallery

    Even if you have made a grave mistake, a good boss should talk to you in private in a civil tone.

  • Open gallery

    Supervisors should always lay down attainable tasks for employees and provide them with the appropriate resources.

  • Open gallery

    If your supervisor tasks you with an impossible task, it is important to discuss and communicate expectations to each other.

  • Open gallery

    Details of personal lives, regardless of whose, should always be kept out of the office.

  • Open gallery

    If you find your boss talking about such things, change the subject back to work. This goes both ways; you should also keep your personal life out of the office.

  • Open gallery

    Comments about gender, physical appearance or anything else that makes one blush is a total no-no.

  • Open gallery

    This borders on the edge of sexual harassment at the workplace.

  • Open gallery

    6. Implying that sex, race, age or religion is a factor in work performance These factors do not affect one's job ability at all.

  • Open gallery

    This is workplace discrimination at its worst.

The mysterious uploader, only known by his user name Shane M, said in his original post that he had filmed the scene as the abuse happened frequently.

He said in a description put up with the original post: "I had just started an internship and noticed my supervisor constantly bullying my co-worker in the workplace.

9 things your boss should never say to you

  • Open gallery

    Commands and orders aren't usually effective unless the worker is in a very regimental organisation such as the army.

  • Open gallery

    Good bosses lead by example and motivate their workers. This way, they cultivate loyalty and drive in their workers.

  • Open gallery

    Supervisors should recognise that employees are the ones producing profits and should never use such a tone with them.

  • Open gallery

    Bosses should reward employees according to their hard work, instead of comparing what other companies are giving their employees.

  • Open gallery

    Time spent in office may be relevant, but no supervisor should make an employee spend too much time in the office environment. This is especially so when the employee may be more productive working from home outside of office hours.

  • Open gallery

    While women do have benefits such as child-care leave or maternity leave, men also have a role to play in raising their children. If a company allocates rewards based on gender, something is not quite right.

  • Open gallery

    Good bosses should never discriminate, especially in matters like religion, gender, political affiliation or race.

  • Open gallery

    Managing an organisation's budget is important, but not if unnecessary spending is cutting into employees' salaries and bonuses.

  • Open gallery

    Managers should lead by example e.g. taking a salary cut together with the rest of the employees.

  • Open gallery

    One of the deadliest phrases for a supervisor to say to an employee, this shows a supervisor's lack of concern for his employees' work.

  • Open gallery

    Listening to an employee for a moment or two can make lots of difference, especially when the employee is just feeling frustrated. It also builds up an employee's loyalty and morale, making him / her a more productive worker.

  • Open gallery

    This merely shows an employee that his / her supervisor is entrenched in a fixed mindset and is unwilling to compromise.

  • Open gallery

    Instead, bosses should say,

  • Open gallery

    Instead of lambasting a worker straight in the face, a supervisor should think about whether expectations have been communicated clearly to the employee.

  • Open gallery

    Supervisors should also ensure that employees are given sufficient resources, budget and support to complete the tasks properly.

  • Open gallery

    Supervisors should never resort to abuse and mean words to speak to employees.

  • Open gallery

    Instead, bosses should always speak politely and with civility. Better yet, point out to the employee what he or she is doing wrong.

"The abuse were (sic) often physical. I confronted him about his behavior, but I felt his explanation was insincere. I fear that his appalling behavior would continue should I not be around to witness it."

ljessica@sph.com.sg

Your daily good stuff - AsiaOne stories delivered straight to your inbox
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy policy and Terms and Conditions.