Off the wall, on the wall

Off the wall, on the wall

Forget solid-hued feature walls to jazz up your home.

When it comes to drawing the eye to a single wall in a room, more off-the-wall ideas are catching on.

Create a feature wall

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    Any wall can be used, even those behind beds or that are curved.

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    The opening will break the flow of the wall because you can see beyond it.

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    Stronger, deeper colours will make your wall appear closer, which is useful if you want to make a long room seem more squarish. Lighter tones make the wall seem further away and give a sense of a larger space.

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    A feature wall need not be finished in just one material. Wallpaper is making a comeback, especially those with a variety of textures and prints. Consider papering one wall to try out a bold print without overwhelming the entire space. You can also use wood panelling, stones, plants or wall decals to create a 3-D feel.

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    Place frames of equal size to make a consistent pattern on the wall. Or choose frames of different sizes, which work better in a random allocation. If anything, you get a personalised wall of memories. You can use this technique with mirrors or plates of different shapes.

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    Look at your furnishings and furniture in the room, such as cushions, rugs or curtains. Choose a hue that will complement them.

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    For example, have a chalkboard wall in the kitchen for notes. Chalkboard paints come in different colours, so your wall does not have to be black either.

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    Do not have a feature wall in every room as this would defeat the purpose of having one standout wall. Pick a wall to highlight something special or to show off your furniture.

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    Choose the correct print or paint, and you could enlarge the feel of the room.

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    Ms Jeannie Cheong and her husband Jason Wong worked with interior designer Katy Chong of Artistroom to create a grid-patterned feature wall in their cafe-like kitchen.

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    The wall, of white tiles and black fillers, stands out in the couple’s five-room HDB improved flat in Bukit Merah - all the other walls are plain white.

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    They wanted the open concept kitchen that shares space with the living room, as they can entertain guest as they cook.

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Feature walls, also known as accent or focal walls, have caught on among home owners here in the last couple of years. This is largely due to more people buying LCD televisions, says interior designer Arean Wong of Space Vision Design.

The 40-year-old says: "In the past, clients never asked us to design a feature wall. But with the LCD television, they want something that will hide wires. So we build a feature wall around the television."

He adds that feature walls have gone beyond having just a single solid colour, which was the common option when the trend first surfaced.

Citing a project he did with curvy glass panels, lit with LED lights against a black backdrop, he says: "Younger clients are also really into design, so they don't just want one colour. They don't mind trying new materials or different shapes."

Take Mr Yee Dingyang, 31, and Ms Lee Jing Jing, 29, who created a feature wall with cheery yellow stripes. A wire mesh panel runs the height of that wall and continues on the ceiling.

The married couple, who live in a four-room HDB flat in Ghim Moh Link, worked with interior designer Li Ziqi, 31, from Oats on the look.

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