Five criteria for buying a house

PHOTO: Five criteria for buying a house

KUALA LUMPUR - A property developer speaking at The Star KL Property Fair 2013 outlined five criteria that buyers and investors should look out for when buying a residential property.

Although location was the top on the list of priorities, said MCT Group executive director Datuk Danny Goh, there were other factors that could cause a development project to fail, even if it was located in a prime location near the city centre.

5 criteria to look at when buying a house

  • The project, to be seen as convenient, must be located within 45km from the city centre, he said, using the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre as a reference point.
  • “There is no perfect location. It depends on the needs of the individual but the most important consideration is that it has to be within an acceptable distance to the city centre, where the job opportunities are,” he said during his talk on how to choose the best property on the second day of the fair here.
  • Having schools nearby is also extremely important, as families would not choose residential areas which are too far from any school.



The project, to be seen as convenient, must be located within 45km from the city centre, he said, using the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre as a reference point.

7 tips to finding a home with good feng shui

  • Most people tend to feel a connection between a hefty price tag and the house of their dreams. While this may be true for most cases, some parts of this statement remain debatable, especially when property feng shui evaluation comes into the picture.
  • When it comes to choosing a property, it is best to say that your choice is not solely based on matters such as architectural design or the colour of the wall or the location of the pool.
  • It is more about the external environment, the mountain, water features and immediate physical setting, and how all these factors work together to build a good feng shui arrangement that benefits the occupants of a property.
  • If a house faces an unfavourable direction, the occupants inside the house would be afflicted with the same inauspicious outcome too. This holds true for most cases.
  • Any property with positive direction can be considered a "good" property. Before you even consider other factors, the property direction will tell you exactly what you need to know about the house, sort of like an introductory summary for a book.
  • Start by observing the façade of the house. This refers to the direction to which the house was designed to face. The most common mistake that people make while taking a direction is to assume that they use the main door as the reference point.
  • Always use the facing direction, instead of the main door. Once this has been ascertained, stand in the middle of the property façade, look out and by using a compass, obtain the facing direction of the property.
  • Once the house direction is determined, the next step is to work out the external environment of your property. The most common one is to drive around within a one to two km radius of the house or land of your choice and observe the macro environment.
  • Natural mountains and locations of water. These two formations improve the feng shui outlook of a vicinity.
  • In the same spot, check for any negative presence of highways or busy roads located in close proximity to the property.
  • Check and ensure there's no pylons or big trees blocking the view from the main door.
  • No steep road in front and at the back of the property.
  • The property should sit on land that is preferably square or at least, rectangular in shape.
  • The presence of wide open spaces such as a parks, ponds or lakes. These features allow qi to gather.
  • Final piece of advice: when it comes to finding a good piece of land or property in feng shui, the goal should always be finding a place that you can renovate to improve and fine tune in the future.

    Happy house-hunting!


“There is no perfect location. It depends on the needs of the individual but the most important consideration is that it has to be within an acceptable distance to the city centre, where the job opportunities are,” he said during his talk on how to choose the best property on the second day of the fair here.

Citing several case studies on housing projects developed in the Klang Valley, Goh pointed out several developments in areas in the Klang Valley which had not managed to sell its units despite its favourable location.

The second criteria, which is the availability of primary and secondary amenities, was also very important, he said.

 “Primary amenities, such as the neighbourhood shop, clinic and schools, must be within 5km from the property. Secondary amenities are supermarkets or hypermarkets and hospitals which should be within 15km away.

“Having schools nearby is also extremely important, as families would not choose residential areas which are too far from any school,” he pointed out.

Other factors that could “make or break” a residential project, he said, were the security facilities such as gated and guarded communities, the branding and size of the entire development as well as the commitment of the developer to fulfil all the promises made.

Later, during a panel discussion, Goh was joined by three other experts for the Online Property Investors Network (OPpin) 3.0 organised by online property forum PropertyWTF.com.my on issues related to Budget 2014 and its impact on the property market.

The speakers were Crowe Horwath KL Tax Sdn Bhd executive director

Fennie Lim, Fincorp Advisory Group managing partner Wong Lin Chi and strategic property investor and trainer Ahyat Ishak.

Wong, during his presentation, pointed out that property prices would rise due to the Budget 2014 proposal of almost doubling the Real Property Gains Tax to 30 per cent.

“Investors, knowing that they will have to bear the cost, would ultimately sell the properties for a higher price,” he said.