This 10,000-yen sushi cake is overflowing with roe and fatty tuna

This 10,000-yen sushi cake is overflowing with roe and fatty tuna
There are over two dozen thick-cut slices of otoro, while the centre is filled to the brim with a fountain of ikura - enough to fill 50 pieces of ikura sushi!
PHOTO: Twitter @japanawe

Forget log cakes this Christmas. Why not indulge in a sushi cake?

Better known as a conveyor belt sushi chain, Kappa Sushi's 10,000-yen (S$123) creation doesn't come cheap.

But with ingredients like ikura (salmon roe) and otoro (fatty tuna belly), who's complaining?

The ultimate cake for sushi lovers comes wrapped with a furoshiki (Japanese wrapping cloth), Japanese-language news blog RocketNews24 reported.

Unfurl it and you will see a wooden sushi tub used to hold the sushi delights.

on Twitter

There are over two dozen thick-cut slices of otoro, while the centre is filled to the brim with a fountain of ikura - enough to fill 50 pieces of ikura sushi!

Instead of flour, the base of this 'cake' is made up of cooked vinegared rice.

How many calories are there in your sushi?

  • Open gallery

    Japanese rice topped with cooked egg - 63kcal, 2.1g protein, 1.5g fa

  • Open gallery

    Japanese rice topped with one cooked prawn - 36kcal, 1.1g protein, 0.1g fat

  • Open gallery

    Japanese rice topped with a slice of raw cuttlefish - 36kcal, 1.9g protein, 0.1g fat

  • Open gallery

    Japanese rice rolled with raw cucumber and wrapped with seaweed - 22kcal, 0.4g protein, 0.1g fat

  • Open gallery

    Japanese rice topped with raw salmon - 59kcal, 2.4g protein, 1.2g fat

  • Open gallery

    Japanese rice rolled with cucumber, crabstick, radish and egg, and wrapped with seaweed - 73kcal, 2g protein, 0.9g fat

  • Open gallery

    Japanese rice rolled with cucumber, egg, crab stick, pickles and radish, and coated with raw prawn roe - 55kcal, 1.7g protein, 1.4g fat

Gold powder flakes are also sprinkled on the otoro, giving the dish an extra glam factor.

There is no etiquette on how the sushi cake should be eaten. Mix it, scoop it, or wrap it with nori (dried seaweed) - anything goes, RocketNews24 said, citing a Kappa Sushi spokesperson.

Sushi doughnuts - the latest food trend on Instagram

  • Open gallery

    A new food trend has emerged on the popular photo sharing platform Instagram, and looks poised to take the world by storm.

  • Open gallery

    Meet the sushi doughnuts - vibrant, healthy, and Instagram-worthy.

  • Open gallery

    In June this year, Sam, the owner of a visual food diary (@sobeautifullyraw) served up the well-loved sushi in the form of the doughnut.

  • Open gallery

    Her yummy-looking creation has rekindled interest in the traditional Japanese dish and also sparked the imagination of fellow chefs and foodies worldwide.

  • Open gallery

    A quick search of the hashtag #sushidonut on Instagram yields an eye-catching array of photos, taken by many inspired foodies and chefs who have unleashed their creativity with their takes on the dish.

  • Open gallery
  • Open gallery
  • Open gallery
  • Open gallery
  • Open gallery

    As demonstrated by several food vloggers on Youtube, it seems quite easy to prepare your sushi doughnut.

  • Open gallery

    All you need are regular sushi ingredients and a doughnut pan.

  • Open gallery
  • Open gallery

    To achieve the coveted doughnut shape, fill the mould with sushi rice. If that's too much carbs for you, sneak in some raw salmon in between the rice.

  • Open gallery

    Now, it's time to have fun! Go crazy with the toppings - some popular ones include cucumber, raw salmon, avocados, wasabi, dried seaweed, fish roe - or any other ingredient that tickles your fancy.

  • Open gallery

    Add a drizzle of mayonnaise or teriyaki sauce and you're done.

  • Open gallery

    Add a drizzle of mayonnaise or teriyaki sauce and you're done.

  • Open gallery
  • Open gallery
  • Open gallery

    Next, sprinkle some sesame seeds, shichimi togarashi (seven-flavor chili pepper), or dried bonito flakes on top of your sushi doughnut.

  • Open gallery

But it may be a misnomer to call it a cake - the dish looks more like a donburi (rice bowl) than a confection. However, Kappa Sushi thought the word 'cake' would give the dish a festive ring - which is apt since it's only available until Jan 9, 2017.

Fingers crossed for some Turkey Sushi then?

grongloh@sph.com.sg

12 facts about sushi that will blow your mind

  • Open gallery

    The oldest form of sushi came from Southeast Asia. Called narezushi, it is made of fish that was salted then wrapped in fermented rice for months, as a means of preservation. Though rare, narezushi can still be found in some restaurants today.

  • Open gallery

    It's now quite common to eat sushi as a meal, and it can get expensive. But it was a cheap fast food option when it first became popular in the 1800s.

  • Open gallery

    BBC reported in 2014 that the real thing costs about $200 per kilogram. It's not hard to figure out why many restaurants pass off a mixture of horseradish, mustard, and green dye as wasabi.

  • Open gallery

    Originally, Japanese sushi makers only used fermenting rice to wrap around fermenting fish to create a unique sour flavour, or umami, in the fish. The rice would be discarded after the months-long process.

  • Open gallery

    If the type of sushi is identified (e.g. makizushi), sushi becomes zushi, apparently for easier pronunciation.

  • Open gallery

    Fugu is one of the deadliest delicacies in the world, and it's the only thing that the emperor of Japan is forbidden to eat, for his own safety. The ban has reportedly been in place for centuries.

  • Open gallery

    According to About.com, the ingredients for makizushi are thoughtfully chosen so that the taste, texture, and colours complement each other.

  • Open gallery

    Because it gets its cylindrical shape from a bamboo mat known as a makisu.

  • Open gallery

    Besides nori (seaweed), makizushi is sometimes wrapped in soy paper, cucumber, shiso leaves, or a thin omelette.

  • Open gallery

    Chopsticks are meant for picking up sashimi slices. So it's still acceptable to use your fingers to eat sushi.

  • Open gallery

    They are required by law to be frozen for a stipulated length of time, to guard against parasites. Some sushi chefs have raised concerns that this regulation might ruin the quality of their food.

  • Open gallery

    Pour just a small amount, and refill when needed, to avoid disapproving stares.

 

More about

Your daily good stuff - AsiaOne stories delivered straight to your inbox
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy policy and Terms and Conditions.