Kit Kat sushi is all of our cravings wrapped into one, for better or worse

Kit Kat sushi is all of our cravings wrapped into one, for better or worse
PHOTO: Kit Kat Japan

We've seen sushi of all kinds: some sweet, some savoury, some unnecessary, some gross and weird.

But, Japan has stepped up their cute food game once again with Kit Kat sushi, our dessert dream come true.

Read also: Kit Kat launches gold-wrapped bar in Japan

The sushi comes in three flavours: Maguro (tuna), Tamago (egg) and Uni (sea urchin). But, don't worry, the flavours are only named for the sushi that inspire them, not for their taste.

Tokyo's first street-facing Kit Kat shop will open on Feb 2 and will sell limited quantities of the candy treat between Feb 2- 4.

Photo: Kit Kat Japan

The Maguro sushi features a raspberry Kit Kat sitting on a bed of puffed rice covered in white chocolate.

Photo: Kit Kat Japan

Tamago is a pumpkin pudding-flavoured Kit Kat, also with white chocolate-covered puffed rice, wrapped in seaweed.

Photo: Kit Kat Japan

Uni features a double helping of Kit Kats with both Hokkaido melon and mascarpone cheese-flavoured candies, also wrapped in seaweed.

Read also: KitKat opens first chocolate concept store in Malaysia

If you're willing to spend 3,000 yen (S$37.50) to kill two cravings with one stone, better do it fast. We expect these cute confections to fly off the shelves.

Read the original article here.


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12 facts about sushi that will blow your mind

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    The oldest form of sushi came from Southeast Asia. Called narezushi, it is made of fish that was salted then wrapped in fermented rice for months, as a means of preservation. Though rare, narezushi can still be found in some restaurants today.

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    It's now quite common to eat sushi as a meal, and it can get expensive. But it was a cheap fast food option when it first became popular in the 1800s.

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    BBC reported in 2014 that the real thing costs about $200 per kilogram. It's not hard to figure out why many restaurants pass off a mixture of horseradish, mustard, and green dye as wasabi.

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    Originally, Japanese sushi makers only used fermenting rice to wrap around fermenting fish to create a unique sour flavour, or umami, in the fish. The rice would be discarded after the months-long process.

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    If the type of sushi is identified (e.g. makizushi), sushi becomes zushi, apparently for easier pronunciation.

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    Fugu is one of the deadliest delicacies in the world, and it's the only thing that the emperor of Japan is forbidden to eat, for his own safety. The ban has reportedly been in place for centuries.

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    According to About.com, the ingredients for makizushi are thoughtfully chosen so that the taste, texture, and colours complement each other.

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    Because it gets its cylindrical shape from a bamboo mat known as a makisu.

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    Besides nori (seaweed), makizushi is sometimes wrapped in soy paper, cucumber, shiso leaves, or a thin omelette.

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    Chopsticks are meant for picking up sashimi slices. So it's still acceptable to use your fingers to eat sushi.

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    They are required by law to be frozen for a stipulated length of time, to guard against parasites. Some sushi chefs have raised concerns that this regulation might ruin the quality of their food.

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    Pour just a small amount, and refill when needed, to avoid disapproving stares.

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