Top 7 restaurants in Singapore for all the meat lovers out there

PHOTO: Red Eye Smokehouse

Can't get enough of chops in your chops? These amazing options around town let you satiate your carnivorous appetites and then some.

Top 7 restaurants in Singapore for all the meat lovers out there

  • What we like about this BBQ joint is the absolutely 'no frills' aura, so you feel like you can let your inhibitions go as you indulge in your meats. At Red Eye Smokehouse, you pick out what you want from an uncomplicated menu, decide how much of the meats you want (you pay by weight), and then have it served on a tray lined with brown grease paper.
  • Meat selections include US Angus beef brisket, smoked lamb merguez sausage, beef short ribs, chicken thigh, and pork jowl. The sides that go with the meats are also incredibly generous. Our favourites include the broccoli salad for a bit of greens and the fail-safe mashed potatoes.
  • CUT by Wolfgang Puck has a more contemporary and elegant take compared to traditional steakhouses. Inside, you see the glitz and glamour more commonly associated with fine dining establishments: the very smartly dressed service staff move fluidly against a backdrop of polished surfaces, structured seats, elegant lighting and silverware.
  • Steaks are dry rubbed, grilled over hardwood and charcoal and then finished under a 1200 degrees Fahrenheit broiler, leaving a tender and juicy inside and an exterior that is slightly crisp and burnt. Don't fancy beef? CUT also offers lamp chops, chicken cooked on a rotisserie and a double thick Iberico pork chop. Make sure you order the sides to go with the meats, including the incredibly delicious creamed spinach that comes with a fried organic egg that flows beautifully into the vegetable dish.
  • Fat Lulu's defines itself as a modern Asian barbecue kitchen, so you see bold and powerful Asian flavours in their grilled meats.
  • Take their Spicy Iberico Pork Sataytay, which has an addictive marinade that is at once sweet, spicy and umami coating juicy, lightly charred skewered meats. You could also go for the spicy BBQ pork ribs, which are drenched in a smokey kecap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce) with refreshing and citrusy notes of coriander and lime. The Duh meat board is another one to order, which comes with wagyu skirt steak, a well-seasoned sambal-marinated Iberico pork and a side of char-grilled kalian. But wait, you should leave room for afters, because Fat Lulu's is also known for their deconstructed-style desserts that are infused with all sorts of textures and flavours.
  • At this modern Australian barbecue, the menu always changes daily (depending on the available produce and the whims and fancies of chef Dave Pynt) but the food at Burnt Ends is consistently stellar.
  • If you're lucky, you would get to order the Sanger burger, where fluffy brioche buns are stuffed with insanely tender and moist pulled pork and refreshingly sweet and citrusy coleslaw. Also go for the beef marmalade and the pickles: where perfectly roasted, tender beef cuts are slathered in a tart marmalade marinade, and then served with thin toasts and topped with crunchy pickles.
  • When it comes to Korean BBQ, you tend to be spoilt for options in Singapore. If you must try only one, go for 8 Korean BBQ, which is less about authenticity and more about deliciousness. The staff there grills the meat for you, so you don't have to endure splatters and can thus just sit back and take photos while you wait for the meats to be grilled.
  • Try their Eight Colours Set, which comprises of eight thick rolls of Mangalitza (Hungarian) pork belly in different flavours. These include milder ones such as ginseng to flavours that pack more punch like curry and miso. The set comes with generous sides of kimchi and beansprouts that are placed on the grill, which soak up the juices from the grilled meats along the way. Not a fan of pork? They also offer Argentinian beef, US prime beef and Joshu wagyu.
  • Magosaburou is a posh yakiniku (Japanese barbecue) restaurant serving premium-grade Japanese wagyu from Kobe and Ohmi. The detailed marbling patterns translate to fat and juicy meats that are bursting with flavours and melt-in-your-mouth goodness after grilling.
  • For a bit of everything, you can order the beef platters which come in different cuts. They offer the Ohmi beef standard platter (180g) that features three of the chef's selections and the Kobe beef platter (320g) features parts like the ribeye, intercostal and the loin. Or, if you're up for something more indulgent, opt for the prestige platter (320g), which features some of the best cuts of Kobe and Ohmi beef.
  • For carnivores with insatiable appetites, there's always The Carvery. Located in Park Hotel Alexandra, it is known for its wide selection of premium roasts. The restaurant has a three-metre-long meat carving station positioned right near the entrance, showcasing a display of succulent cuts of beef, lamb, pork and chicken.
  • A carver is always on site on serve up your preferred cuts. Behind the station, roasting ovens and a rotisserie parade the meats that are being prepared fresh daily.

For an American-style barbecue: Red Eye Smokehouse

What we like about this BBQ joint is the absolutely 'no frills' aura, so you feel like you can let your inhibitions go as you indulge in your meats.

At Red Eye Smokehouse, you pick out what you want from an uncomplicated menu, decide how much of the meats you want (you pay by weight), and then have it served on a tray lined with brown grease paper.

Meat selections include US Angus beef brisket, smoked lamb merguez sausage, beef short ribs, chicken thigh, and pork jowl. The sides that go with the meats are also incredibly generous.

Our favourites include the broccoli salad for a bit of greens and the fail-safe mashed potatoes.

1 Cavan Rd, tel: 6291 0218

Burpple's guide to the 14 best places for steak in Singapore

  • For premium Japanese cuts

    Fat Cow boasts cuts from several parts of Japan, Australia and the US, and what you should really go for is the Japanese Wagyu, which they offer in grades A3, A4 and A5. Depending on your preference, you can choose how you want your steak to be cooked: shabu shabu, sukiyaki, charcoal grilled or teppanyaki. Go for charcoal grilled; they do a nice, smoky sear on the outside while leaving the centre pink, so that you get to enjoy the marbling of the beef. For a more pocket-friendly option, their lunch sets are priced from $26 (includes salad, chawanmushi, miso soup and dessert) with the Fat Cow Donburi ($39, charcoal grilled Wagyu beef, onsen egg and white leek) winning the votes of many. (Photo by Jacq Ong)

  • For super affordable steak

    Le Steak by Chef Amri is a family-friendly steakhouse that is well-loved for the superb sirloin steak, as well as grilled chicken and seared salmon - all priced reasonably below $20. Even the desserts like bread pudding or creme brulee are a hit at just under $10. If you're in the Jalan Kayu area, this is the perfect place for dinner with your loved ones. If that's too far, the newest outlet along Mackenzie Road might be a better option. (Photo by Syiqy Salleh)

  • For amazing steak in town

    This cosy spot tucked in a corner at Somerset is easy to miss, but if you love steak, then you should have heard about it. To kickstart your meal, they serve freshly baked flatbread on the house, served with butter and roasted garlic. Go straight for the Bedrock Pepper Steak ($79), a 300g slab of Angus ribeye that's succulent, flavoursome and tender, and served with a black peppercorn sauce. The steak is, however, good enough on its own. Make sure you don't miss their highly raved about Bedrock Mac n' Cheese ($20), baked with four types of cheese and drizzled with aromatic truffle oil. For a more affordable option, go for their three-course lunch sets ($38 for seafood and poultry, $58 for steaks). (Photo by Alainlicious Eats)

  • For divine ribeye steak

    The BetterField is an unassuming cafe that serves some pretty kick-ass food, and the Black Angus Ribeye is one dish that would be a sin to miss, if you love meat. It's very simply done - seasoned with salt and pepper and "pan-seared for an impeccable crust", as tastemaker Rachel Xie puts it - but more than delivers in taste. It's juicy, tender, flavourful and everything you could ever want in a steak. At just $20 for 200g (but also served in portions of 400g and 600g), this steak will definitely sate your carnivorous cravings without burning a hole in your wallet. (Photo by Julius Lim)

  • For charcoal-grilled hangar steak

    Burnt Ends is famous for their pulled pork burger and sharing plates, but they do steaks equally well. The Onglet ($26/100g) is a very well executed piece of charcoal-grilled hanger steak - charred to perfection, wonderfully tender and packs a punch of flavour along with the accompanying beef jus. The Rump Cap is excellent as well: cooked flawlessly and served with burnt onion sauce and and bone marrow. Also great is the Mayura Cube Roll ($60/100g), that as Tastemaker Veronica Phua puts it, is "buttery to the nth degree" and "expertly grilled with nothing but a sprinkle of sea salt - the epitome of a perfect steak". (Photo by Rachel Xie)

  • For value-for-money steak

    Located just beside the SMU Administration building in town, this little steakhouse is a go-to for inexpensive steaks. With beef steaks priced from $14.90 and chicken steaks from just $8.90 (with two sides), it is no doubt that it has become a popular place for university students and the working crowd. Signatures include the specialty NZ Angus Ribeye (from $19.90 for a 200g cut with two complimentary sides) and the Teriyaki Chicken Steak ($8.90). They come in big portions, and there's no GST or service charge! (Photo by Marshall Too)

  • For swanky, upscale steak

    CUT by celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck is a swanky American steakhouse located in Marina Bay Sands. Expect the usual cuts: sirloin, rib-eye, filet mignon. All steaks are dry rubbed, grilled over hard wood and charcoal, then finished under a 1200ºF (about 650ºC) broiler. If you're with a group, order the 990g Porterhouse Australian Angus ($175). Charred to give a slightly caramelised exterior, done medium/medium rare and ridiculously juicy and tender, this one's for meat lovers. The steaks here do not come with sides, so you can order some to share, like the buttery smooth Yukon Gold Potato Puree ($18) and the Creamed Spinach with Fried Egg ($18). (Photo by Seth Lui)

  • For Tomahawk steak and beef Wellington

    Located in Swissotel The Stamford, Wooloomooloo boasts a sexy, classy interior with a stunning view. This steakhouse originates from Hong Kong and serves up excellent, quality cuts of meat such as Australian Black Angus and USDA Prime beef. Meat lovers should go for the Australian Black Angus Tomahawk ($155), a whole rib steak which serves two ravenous carnivores. The Beef Wellington ($74) is not to be missed either - think perfectly cooked filet mignon with mushroom duxelle, wrapped in Parma ham and topped with foie gras all encased in a buttery puff pastry served with Madeira sauce. The food here comes with a slightly steep price tag, but it's easy to justify with the great view and even better steak. (Photo by Gavin Chan)

  • For steak and frites

    Les Bouchons could probably serve as the benchmark for good steak frites in Singapore. The signature dish at this Parisian steakhouse is the Grilled Ribeye Steak, served with herb butter, free-flow duck fat fries and a side of salad. The steak is cooked perfectly medium rare, juicy and well-seasoned, and the fragrant herb butter, while not necessary, lends a little bit of decadence to the dish. The fries are twice-cooked, making them extra crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside - absolutely addictive. (Photo by Shurong Lo)

  • For simple and good Angus steak

    Expect a no-frills and unpretentious platter of juicy Angus steak at this zi char place, complete with wedges, caramelised onions and beef fried rice (rice fried in beef fat). Seasoned with just salt and pepper, this is perfectly cooked to mouth-watering succulence and perfection - what's not to love? At $12 per 100g, it's not hard to see why this is a must-order when you head to New Ubin Seafood. (Photo by Peter Wong)

  • For parrilla-grilled steak

    SKIRT is a chic steakhouse at W Singapore that prides itself on sourcing only the finest sustainable ingredients and preparing them with simple yet skilful techniques, including grilling their meats on a parrilla grill. Meats here are sourced from Ireland, US and Australia, mostly dry-aged, and the selection is extensive. For something a little different, start off with the Charcuterie Plate. Most popular here is the Signature Blackmore Wagyu Skirt Steak (note that this is not dry-aged). It's juicy and full of umami and beefy flavours, but can get slightly rich due to the fat content. Otherwise, go for the Donald Russell Irish cut - dry aged, exceedingly tender and flavour packed. (Photo by Keropok Man)

  • For classic American steak

    Morton's is a fine dining establishment that ranks high up in the best places to go for a darn good steak in Singapore. The Center Cut Prime Rib-eye is the steak you'll want to go for, for a slightly charred, caramelised exterior that gives way to a juicy centre with a good amount of marbling, flavour and texture. If you prefer something that's leaner, then the Center Cut Filet Mignon is a better option. However, due to the lack of fat, you might find it less flavourful than the ribeye. Leave stomach space for their Legendary Hot Chocolate Cake, a rich, indulgent molten lava cake that is worth every calorie. (Photo by Seth Lui)

  • For spot-on Tuscan steak

    As its name suggests, this Italian steakhouse specialises in Florentine steak. The signature Tuscan Bistecca alla Fiorentina ($178, steak Florentine) weighs a whopping 1.1kg and can easily feed three to four. After a simple marination in olive oil and an herby salt rub, the thick slab of bone-in Australian F1 Wagyu is cooked over a high temperature wood-fired grill resulting in a charred crust to seal in all the juicy, beefy goodness. With a marbling score of 6+, the fat to meat ratio is spot on for an epic thick cut steak experience. (Photo by BiteClub SG)

  • For prime rib steak

    Having been around since 1999, Lawry's is a classy, well-established steakhouse located in Mandarin Gallery. And yes, this is a place you'll want to bring someone you want to impress. Go for the extremely tender Roasted Prime Ribs, their signature dish, served with Yorkshire pudding and mashed potatoes. It comes in several portion sizes (ranging from 160-450g), depending on how hearty your appetite is. For a sweet finale, go for the Crepe Suzette; prepared tableside, the sweet, buttery, citrusy and slightly boozy treat is guaranteed to tickle your taste buds! (Photo by belle ong)

For good old steaks: CUT by Wolfgang Puck

CUT by Wolfgang Puck has a more contemporary and elegant take compared to traditional steakhouses. Inside, you see the glitz and glamour more commonly associated with fine dining establishments: the very smartly dressed service staff move fluidly against a backdrop of polished surfaces, structured seats, elegant lighting and silverware.

The restaurant's meat comes from a variety of sources. The wagyu selections come from the US, Australia and Japan. There are also Australian Angus and UK Red Poll beef cuts.

Steaks are dry rubbed, grilled over hardwood and charcoal and then finished under a 1200 degrees Fahrenheit broiler, leaving a tender and juicy inside and an exterior that is slightly crisp and burnt.

Don't fancy beef? CUT also offers lamp chops, chicken cooked on a rotisserie and a double thick Iberico pork chop.

Make sure you order the sides to go with the meats, including the incredibly delicious creamed spinach that comes with a fried organic egg that flows beautifully into the vegetable dish.

2 Bayfront Avenue, #B1-71 Galleria Level, The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands, tel: 6688 8517

6 restaurants in Singapore for cheap fine dining dinners under $100

  • If eating at fine dining restaurants isn't a habit of yours, The Clan makes for a good first experience as staff are friendly and the vibe not too stuffy or intimidating, despite an exclusive-looking interior. The restaurant has moved from its previous premises on Neil Road to PoMo.
  • Their six-course set dinner costs $78++ and you have a choice between mains such as Wagyu beef loin ($48 a la carte menu) and Spanish pork belly ($32 a la carte).
  • Bridge is one of Singapore's most affordable fine dining restaurants, and is targeted at ordinary people who want to have their first taste of the formal dining experience. That means they design their menus to be cost effective. You won't see waiters walking around in tuxedos here.
  • The three-course menu costs $55+ per person and currently includes a choice between chrysanthemum infused snapper ($30 a la carte) and corn-fed chicken with coconut kaffir sauce ($30 a la carte), while the five-course menu costs $95+ per person. The a la carte menu includes foie gras and melon honey vinegar sauce ($22) and black venera rice and oyster ($32).
  • Senso is one of Singapore's best loved Italian fine dining joints and has been around for ages. The vibe is very classic, so try not to wear your T-shirt with the banana print.
  • Homemade pasta dishes include ravioli al vitello ($32) and taglierini neri o bianchi ($34) (that's squid ink pasta), while mains include roast cod fillet ($40).
  • This Japanese-inspired steakhouse attracts carnivores in droves, all hankering for the juiciest cut of Wagyu.
  • Meat of this quality doesn't come cheap - this isn't Aston's. A half cut of Grade A3 tenderloin saga costs $98 - and that's the cheapest cut on the menu. A full cut of Grade A5 ribeye tochigi will set you back $320.
  • The new National Gallery opened to much fanfare in 2015, but many Singaporeans are more excited by the fact that it's the building where Aura is housed than the actual exhibitions.
  • Their four-course set dinner costs $88 and features contemporary Italian dishes - during the Chinese New Year season they'll be serving up porcini mushroom tortelli with pumpkin and candied ginger, and whole steamed Italian seabass with asparagus and sea urchin sauce ($39 a la carte).
  • Local cuisine rarely gets much airtime when it comes to haute cuisine, which is what makes Labyrinth so unique. The menu has been designed to display Singaporean flavours and textures.
  • Order from the a la carte menu and you should be able to keep the bill to under $100 per person.

    Their starters include Hokkaido scallop ($20) and Hiroshima oyster laksa ($18), mains include roasted pork belly siew yoke umami rice ($24) and cod XO fish noodle soup ($30), and there's lychee, corn and strawberry ice kachang ($16) and xiao long bao chendol ($8) on the dessert menu.

For inventive barbecued meats: Fat Lulu's

Fat Lulu's defines itself as a modern Asian barbecue kitchen, so you see bold and powerful Asian flavours in their grilled meats. Take their Spicy Iberico Pork Sataytay, which has an addictive marinade that is at once sweet, spicy and umami coating juicy, lightly charred skewered meats.

You could also go for the spicy BBQ pork ribs, which are drenched in a smokey kecap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce) with refreshing and citrusy notes of coriander and lime. The Duh meat board is another one to order, which comes with wagyu skirt steak, a well-seasoned sambal-marinated Iberico pork and a side of char-grilled kailan.

But wait, you should leave room for afters, because Fat Lulu's is also known for their deconstructed-style desserts that are infused with all sorts of textures and flavours.

297 River Valley Road, tel: 9236 5002

5 myths about Kobe beef debunked

  • Right now there's no regulated definition for "Kobe beef". "Kobe is a city famous for the quality of its Wagyu (the proper name for Japanese beef), but it represents less than 1 percent of all Japanese beef," Goulding writes in Rice, Noodle, Fish. "Lavishly marbled Wagyu comes from nearly all of Japan's forty-seven prefectures."
  • Nope. "Kobe is what your local gastropub calls its sliders," Goulding writes. An American (or New Zealand, or Australian...) rancher could raise a cow to have a high fat-to-muscle ratio, but the flavour may pale in comparison to that of genuine Wagyu. (Photo: Shutterstock.com)
  • It's not the norm. "Rumours that Japanese cows get fat on beer, sake, and massages turn out to be greatly exaggerated," Goulding writes. "Historically, some small part of the Wagyu industry advocated beer or sake to stimulate appetite in warmer months... but the practice is limited to a tiny percentage of the overall Wagyu game." (Photo: Shutterstock.com)
  • Actually, the reverse is true. "Most cows live on a diet rich in grains and move very little-two secrets to the intense intramuscular marbling," writes Goulding. That doesn't mean they don't eat grass - all cows do. (Photo: Shutterstock.com)
  • Yes, Wagyu is fatty as hell (and thereby incredibly delicious). Dietary fat and cholesterol weren't the nutritional evils researchers once thought they were, according to numerous studies from the last several years. Plus, Wagyu is typically higher in heart-healthy monounsaturated fats than most beef, says Goulding.

For comfort food: Burnt Ends

At this modern Australian barbecue, the menu always changes daily (depending on the available produce and the whims and fancies of chef Dave Pynt) but the food at Burnt Ends is consistently stellar.

If you're lucky, you would get to order the Sanger burger, where fluffy brioche buns are stuffed with insanely tender and moist pulled pork and refreshingly sweet and citrusy coleslaw. Also go for the beef marmalade and the pickles: where perfectly roasted, tender beef cuts are slathered in a tart marmalade marinade, and then served with thin toasts and topped with crunchy pickles.

We suggest picking a counter seat to see the flurry of action happening in the open kitchen as the chefs prepare your food. There's usually a waiting list for reservations, so book way in advance.

20 Teck Lim Road, tel: 6224 3933

5 places to get delicious steak for less than $30

  • 277 Orchard Road, #04-01 Orchard Gateway, 238858
  • Before being sent to the grill, their juicy Australian steaks are dry-aged for 21 days for maximum flavour concentration, guaranteeing that you don't have to suffer through tasteless, tough cuts of beef. Their lunch menu is especially tempting, with a soup and drink included in for a the total price of $22.90. Golly!
  • King's Arcade #01-01, 559 Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 269695
  • This adorably-named BBQ Grillhouse is the sister store of the famous ice-cream parlour Island Creamery, and (as usual) their offerings don't disappoint in the least slightest. Besides their Sanzoku Black Pepper Striploin Steak ($13.90), I'd vouch for their bestselling Waikiki Deluxe burger (strips of bacon, melted cheese, and sweet pineapple on top of a handmade beef patty), which I ordered on both my visits there. There's also a laid-back, holiday feel to the ambience, which I truly enjoy.
  • 1 Maju Avenue,Serangoon Gardens, #02-03, Singapore 556679
  • Serangoon is home to many of the best cafes and eateries in Singapore (Lola's Cafe, Lad&Dad, just to name a few), and iSteaks is enough reason for Singaporeans living out of the area to make the trip down. iSteaks was previously a humble hawker stall, but has now earned it's its place in the myVillage mall. Their steaks are well-cooked and very affordably-priced (Australian ribeyes go as cheap as $15 and wagyu prices starts from $35).
  • Orchard Rd, Singapore 238839
  • Ah, the Hot Tomato Cafe. A favorite favourite go-to for those looking for a cheap and good Western cuisine. Don't expect 5-star fine-dining standards, but the quality and taste of their food far surpasses its price. I dine at their 313 outlet rather frequently, and most of the time I ask for my favorite favourite Steak & Prawn ($13.90), which I love because it combines my favorite favourite type of meat seafood with the a classic medium-rare steak.
  • 89 Victoria St, Singapore 188017
  • Conveniently located nearby SMU and NAFA, this little grillhouse is a favorite favourite hangout for many students, and judging from its affordable price and quality taste, it's not hard to see why so. Well, regardless of whether you're a student or not, you're bound to enjoy your cut of New Zealand and Australian beef, simply prepared on a hot grill with a dash of salt and pepper. No overload of peppery or BBQ sauce, thank goodness. Prices start at $16.90 to a maximum of just $36.90 for the Angus Ribeye. If the above reasons hasn't haven't convinced you to give it a try yet, this one will: there is absolutely no GST charge. Doesn't that sound like music to your (broke) ears?

For Korean BBQ: 8 Korean BBQ

When it comes to Korean BBQ, you tend to be spoilt for options in Singapore. If you must try only one, go for 8 Korean BBQ, which is less about authenticity and more about deliciousness.

The staff there grill the meat for you, so you don't have to endure splatters and can thus just sit back and take photos while you wait for the meats to be grilled.

Try their Eight Colours Set, which comprises of eight thick rolls of Mangalitza (Hungarian) pork belly in different flavours. These include milder ones such as ginseng to flavours that pack more punch like curry and miso. The set comes with generous sides of kimchi and beansprouts that are placed on the grill, which soak up the juices from the grilled meats along the way.

Not a fan of pork? They also offer Argentinian beef, US prime beef and Joshu wagyu.

6 Eu Tong Sen Street, #02-79/90 The Central, tel: 8692 1188 and 1 Scotts Road, #04-20/21 Shaw Centre, tel: 9018 9212

6 best places to satisfy your Korean BBQ cravings in Singapore

  • Let's start on the slightly pricier scale. Famous for their eight-colour sets, which consists of eight different flavours of pork belly, 8 Korean BBQ also serves up some pretty tasty bingsu. That's like the Korean version of ice kacang for those of you who are unacquainted. (Photo: 8 Korean BBQ)
  • For the full eight-colour set it'll cost you about $98 and for the four-colour set (you get to choose four flavours) it'll cost you about $58. Other meats like the ribeye steak, will cost you by weight. 200g of meat will cost you about $38. Once you're done make sure you check try their bimbimbap bingsu, which is a bingsu that's been disguised as a bimbimbap. (Photo: 8 Korean BBQ)
  • Super Star K is one of the few Korean BBQ restaurants to use charcoal as the source of heat for cooking. Apart from their buffet menu which mainly consists of different types of meat like beef, pork and chicken, they also have an a la carte menu. (Photo: Super Star K Korean BBQ Restaurant)
  • Your meat for the buffet can range from $18 to $35 depending on what you get. Most of the chicken options like spicy or soy sauce chicken fall under the $18 category along with pork options like pork bulgoggi or pork belly. The more expensive options are beef, starting at $28 for a plate of grilled beef brisket and $35 for beef ribs. (Photo: Super Star K Korean BBQ Restaurant)
  • Located on the ground floor of Link Hotel in Tiong Bahru, Blue Garden Korean BBQ offers an all-you-can-eat buffet for $19.90+ during lunch and $26.90+ during dinner. Pretty good pricing considering it's an all-you-can-eat. (Photo: Blue Garden Korean BBQ Buffet)
  • The meat here is known for its high quality, according to my friends, and the free flow of sides (including kimchi pancakes, Korean spicy rice cakes aka ddukbokkie (my fav), and a pretty awesome kimchi variety) are definitely a bonus. (Photo: Blue Garden Korean BBQ Buffet)
  • Tucked away in Tanjong Pagar, this KBBQ is probably one of the most popular ones out there, so brace yourselves for the long queue that usually forms during lunch and dinner time. (Photo: 2D1N Soju Bang Korean Restaurant)
  • The pricing here is rather standard, $22 per adult and you'll have access to all the meat that you desire. If the buffet is not enough for you, they offer an ala carte selection as well. (Photo: 2D1N Soju Bang Korean Restaurant)
  • Conveniently located at School Of The Arts (SOTA), it's a popular spot for students because of its super affordable price range. Go for lunch on a weekday and have an all you can eat KBBQ for only $14.
  • Even if you can't make it for lunch, dinner on the weekends is only going to cost you $24.90. Very worth it if you ask me. Oh, and did I mention that you'll get some slightly more premium meats during dinner?
  • If you are not salivating by now, then maybe a $12 Korean BBQ buffet meal might do it for you. It really couldn't get any cheaper than that. Being the sister restaurant to the above, 2D1N Soju Bang, serves up meats that are just as quality as Ssikkek. (Photo: TripAdvisor)
  • If you're in a rut on where to go, and if you don't want to queue up for half an hour then this Korean BBQ won't let you down. (Photo: Ssikkek Korean Grill BBQ Buffet)

For yakiniku: Magosaburo

Magosaburou is a posh yakiniku (Japanese barbecue) restaurant serving premium-grade Japanese wagyu from Kobe and Ohmi.

The detailed marbling patterns translate to fat and juicy meats that are bursting with flavours and melt-in-your-mouth goodness after grilling.

For a bit of everything, you can order the beef platters which come in different cuts. They offer the Ohmi beef standard platter (180g) that features three of the chef's selections and the Kobe beef platter (320g) features parts like the ribeye, intercostal and the loin.

Or, if you're up for something more indulgent, opt for the prestige platter (320g), which features some of the best cuts of Kobe and Ohmi beef.

2 Orchard Turn, #04-11A & 05-01 ION Orchard, tel: 6634 1411

6 great yakiniku restaurants in Singapore

  • If the name Yakiniquest sounds unusual for a restaurant, well, it is. And there is an interesting story behind this high-end grilled beef, or yakiniku, restaurant in Boat Quay.

    Its managing director, Mr Suguru Ishida started a blog in Tokyo with four other yakiniku enthusiasts in 2004. For more than 15 years, he ate at 150 yakiniku places a year. The beef chronicles became popular and led to him being featured on television and radio as well as in magazines.

  • A good way to explore the offerings here is to opt for the $120 Special Omakase. It has three rounds of grilled beef, appetisers, rice or udon, and dessert. The restaurant serves beef from Kagoshima, Miyazaki and Iwate, using cuts such as rump and thigh that deliver on flavour, not just marbling.
  • A lot of care is given to the appetisers. Niku Soumen, beef cut into strands to look like somen noodles, is served like Japanese cold noodles, with a soya dipping sauce, seaweed, scallions and a dab of wasabi. The beef, on its own, tastes sweet, with a slight minerality. Mix it with the sauce and toppings and umami takes over.
  • There is a hidden gem in Circular Road called The Hitsuji Club. The 22-seater offers something familiar, yet different - it is a Jingisukan restaurant. The word refers to Genghis Khan and the dish comes from the notion that his soldiers grilled mutton on their helmets to fortify themselves for battle.
  • Prices start at $40 for a set good for one person. You get 200g of sliced lamb and vegetables. For $70, also good for one, you get 200g of sliced lamb, 200g of lamb chops, mushrooms and vegetables.
  • Be sure to try the lamb chops ($32 for 200g). They come well trimmed and grill up tender and juicy, provided you do not cook them all the way through.
  • There is one thing you should know about dining at this Japanese barbecue meat specialist restaurant: the three-second rule.
  • This refers to the recommended cooking time for each side of a thin slice of beef. Depending on the cut, it can go up to five seconds on each side.
  • The beef here is sublimely flavourful and melts in the mouth, even if you overcook it.
  • Ito-Kacho at the Mandarin Gallery specialises in wagyu beef from black cows in Kyushu in southern Japan and is a branch of the Ito-Kacho restaurant in Tokyo.
  • Go for the Japanese beef which, though more expensive, is superior in flavour and texture.
  • Begin with a lean cut such as flap meat and work your way up to the short rib because if you start with the prime cut first, chances are you won't enjoy the other cuts as much. The juicy, tender short rib is an indulgence worth every cent, as every bite is rewarded with a burst of aromatic fat.
  • Magosaburou serves excellent grade beef - Ohmi and Kobe beef - with beautiful marbling that translates to tender, juicy meat that oozes aromatic fat when grilled.
  • What's worth pointing out is the restaurant has an effective exhaust system, so no smell of food lingers in the air, and you don't have the smell of oil clinging to you after a meal.
  • The meats are served with a slice of lemon, a flavoured salt and a housemade dip that has a sourish tinge. Dipping the beef in lemon will help if you are feeling weighed down by the fat.
  • On the menu is a wide range of cuts, including some that are not very common, such as tri-tip and bottom flap, at very good prices. A diagram in the restaurant helpfully shows which part of the cow the cuts are from, as well as the level of fat and marbling.
  • The Premium Rare Plate ($48 for 150g) allows you to choose three uncommon cuts for a sampling before you decide on your favourites.
  • The less adventurous can go for common cuts such as Chateaubriand ($50 for 100g) and Japanese Wagyu Sirloin ($42.50 for 100g), which are pretty good quality for the prices.

For a meat buffet: The Carvery

For carnivores with insatiable appetites, there's always The Carvery. Located in Park Hotel Alexandra, it is known for its wide selection of premium roasts.

The restaurant has a three-metre-long meat carving station positioned right near the entrance, showcasing a display of succulent cuts of beef, lamb, pork and chicken.

A carver is always on site on serve up your preferred cuts. Behind the station, roasting ovens and a rotisserie parade the meats that are being prepared fresh daily.

323 Alexandra Road, Level 7 Park Hotel Alexandra, tel: 6828 8880

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