Healthier choice recipe: Guilt-free pizza

SINGAPORE - Add some pizzazz to your pizza by drizzling some olive oil on it.

Olive oil is rich in unsaturated fat, which is converted into high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or "good" cholesterol, in the bloodstream.

Good cholesterol helps remove low-density cholesterol, or "bad" cholesterol, thereby reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Bad cholesterol raises the risk of these diseases when it is present in an excessive amount, which is then deposited on artery walls, narrowing them.

Baking pizza also means that relatively less oil is needed to cook it.

Mr Yen Koh, regional executive chef at the food solutions department of Unilever Singapore, created his pizza misto funghi (mixed mushroom pizza in Italian) with the help of the Health Promotion Board (HPB).

It is among 150 healthier dishes that the HPB and several chefs came up with, either by adapting existing recipes or developing them from scratch.

Mr Koh said: "I enjoy having friends over at home and this is one of their all-time favourites."

RECIPE

Pizza misto funghi
(Mixed mushroom pizza)
(Serves four)

INGREDIENTS

1 frozen pizza base, medium
100g bottled pizza sauce
100g shiitake mushrooms, sliced
100g canned button mushrooms, drained and sliced
40g mozzarella cheese
1 tsp olive oil

Method

METHOD

1. Thaw the pizza base. Then spread the pizza sauce onto it.

2. Line it with the sliced shiitake mushrooms and button mushrooms.

3. Then top everything with mozzarella cheese.

4. Bake the pizza for seven minutes in a preheated oven at 250 deg C.

5. Drizzle olive oil over the pizza and serve.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION
(Per serving)

Energy: 147 kilocalories
Protein: 6.9g
Total fat: 4.2g
Saturated fat: 1.6g
Cholesterol: 7mg
Carbohydrate: 20.8g
Dietary fibre: 1.4g
Sodium: 376mg

TIPS

To reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, use oil that is high in unsaturated fat, such as canola oil and sunflower oil, instead of oil that is high in saturated fat, such as ghee and butter.

Use more of some types of vegetables, such as tomatoes, corn, peas and mushrooms. These are good sources of glutamate and act as natural flavour enhancers, so less salt is needed.

Consumption of high levels of sodium, found in salt, has been linked to the development of high blood pressure.


Get a copy of Mind Your Body, The Straits Times or go to straitstimes.com for more stories.

VIDEOS TO WATCH

SERVICES