One big resolution: World's fattest man aims to half his weight

One big resolution: World's fattest man aims to half his weight
PHOTO: AFP

Zapopan, Mexico - A Mexican man believed to be the world's most obese plans to undergo gastric bypass in the new year and reduce his 590kg by half, his doctor said Wednesday.

The man known as Juan Pedro has diabetes, high blood pressure and chronic lung obstruction, and needs to reduce his weight dramatically to reduce his health risks, doctor Jose Castaneda Cruz said.

He said the man, who does not give his family names to media, would actually undergo a couple procedures along the way.

"It's surgery that is going to be done in two parts. That is because of the high risk of complications he faces. So it's going to be done in two parts, six months apart," Castaneda told reporters.

World's fattest man aims to half his weight of 590kg

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    A Mexican man believed to be the world's most obese plans to undergo gastric bypass in the new year and reduce his 590kg by half, his doctor said

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    The man known as Juan Pedro has diabetes, high blood pressure and chronic lung obstruction, and needs to reduce his weight dramatically to reduce his health risks

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    He said the man, who does not give his family names to media, would actually undergo a couple procedures along the way.

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    "It's surgery that is going to be done in two parts. That is because of the high risk of complications he faces. So it's going to be done in two parts, six months apart," the doctor told reporters.

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    In the first procedure, surgeons will remove more than three-quarters of the patient's stomach.

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    And in the second procedure, his remaining stomach will be partially blocked, helping to give a feeling of fullness.

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    Juan Pedro would also undergo intestinal surgery, his doctor said.

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    His doctor wants him to lose 59kg in the first six months, which alone reduces his risk of obesity-related cancer by 52 per cent.

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    Juan Pedro, 32, has a good chance of losing half his body weight by about six months after his first surgery, according to his medical team.

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    "Slowly but surely, I'll get there," Juan Pedro told reporters.

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In the first procedure, surgeons will remove more than three-quarters of the patient's stomach.

And in the second procedure, his remaining stomach will be partially blocked, helping to give a feeling of fullness. Juan Pedro would also undergo intestinal surgery, his doctor said.

Castaneda wants him to lose 59kg in the first six months, which alone reduces his risk of obesity-related cancer by 52 per cent.

Juan Pedro, 32, has a good chance of losing half his body weight by about six months after his first surgery, according to his medical team.

"Slowly but surely, I'll get there," Juan Pedro told reporters.

Also read: Fattest woman in the world weighs 500 kg

Also read: Being overweight, obese cuts lifespan by one to 10 years: study

121kg man who loved eating loses 50kg after gastric bypass surgery

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    Imagine consuming five to six upsized fast food meals a day, tipping the scales at over 120kg, suffering from serious health issues such as high cholesterol, diabetes, and high blood pressure - and being told at the age of 21 that you're in danger of getting a heart attack.

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    This was the life of Mr Shaun Lawrence, now 36, for the past 30 years.

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    Meet him today and you probably will not be able to tell that he was previously obese and battled such serious health issues. That is because he went through a gastric bypass surgery in late 2011

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    "In the past, I could only do simple things like walking from my home to the MRT station or crossing over to the coffeeshop."

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    "Other than that, I was never able to take part in fun activities I wanted to like football and swimming."

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    On top of that, taking the public transport was a challenge too. Being a big person, Shawn always felt he was occupying too much space, and noticed that people rarely stood next to him.

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    Today, Shaun makes it a point to keep himself active by running 5km three times a week as well as swim occasionally.

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    Since the surgery, Shaun has lost 50kg - from a whopping 121kg to 71kg. Impressive, huh?

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    "I could have gone through the bypass a long time ago, but I refused because I could not say 'no' to food," he says.

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    During an interview with the Stomp Team, Shaun recalls his poor diet habits prior to the surgery.

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    "I would get hungry every two to three hours, and despite consuming a full upsized meal from McDonald's, I would still feel hungry within an hour or so.

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    "That was when I started snacking, drinking loads of sweet drinks to curb the craving -- but of course I was never really hungry, I simply needed something to munch on all the time.

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    According to Shaun, what the surgery does is that it controls the food intake of the person. He says: "They operate it such that only a small portion of your stomach will be in use - mine shrank to the size of a palm!"

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    This would mean eating much lesser than before, which was exactly what Shaun had feared.

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    It was not until his doctor informed him of his bad diabetic situation during the last medical checkup before the surgery that he decided to proceed with it.

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    "So after the operation, as long as I watch my weight, watch my food intake -- the chances of diabetes coming back would be very low."

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